Code of Ethics
of the National Association of Social Workers

Approved by the 1996 NASW Delegate Assembly and revised by the 2008 NASW Delegate Assembly
The 2008 NASW Delegate Assembly approved the following revisions to the NASW Code of Ethics:
1.05 Cultural Competence and Social Diversity

(c) Social workers should obtain education about and seek to understand the nature of social diversity and oppression with respect to race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, marital status, political belief, religion, immigration status, and mental or physical disability.

2.01 Respect

(a) Social workers should treat colleagues with respect and should represent accurately and fairly the qualifications, views, and obligations of colleagues.
(b) Social workers should avoid unwarranted negative criticism of colleagues in communications with clients or with other professionals. Unwarranted negative criticism may include demeaning comments that refer to colleagues’ level of competence or to individuals’ attributes such as race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, marital status, political belief, religion, immigration status, and mental or physical disability.

4.02 Discrimination

Social workers should not practice, condone, facilitate, or collaborate with any form of discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, marital status, political belief, religion, immigration status, or mental or physical disability.

6.04 Social and Political Action

(d) Social workers should act to prevent and eliminate domination of, exploitation of, and discrimination against any person, group, or class on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, marital status, political belief, religion, immigration status, or mental or physical disability.

close window

Preamble

The primary mission of the social work profession is to enhance human well-being and help meet the basic human needs of all people, with particular attention to the needs and empowerment of people who are vulnerable, oppressed, and living in poverty. A historic and defining feature of social work is the profession’s focus on individual well-being in a social context and the well-being of society. Fundamental to social work is attention to the environmental forces that create, contribute to, and address problems in living.

Social workers promote social justice and social change with and on behalf of clients. “Clients” is used inclusively to refer to individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers are sensitive to cultural and ethnic diversity and strive to end discrimination, oppression, poverty, and other forms of social injustice. These activities may be in the form of direct practice, community organizing, supervision, consultation administration, advocacy, social and political action, policy development and implementation, education, and research and evaluation. Social workers seek to enhance the capacity of people to address their own needs. Social workers also seek to promote the responsiveness of organizations, communities, and other social institutions to individuals’ needs and social problems.

The mission of the social work profession is rooted in a set of core values. These core values, embraced by social workers throughout the profession’s history, are the foundation of social work’s unique purpose and perspective:

  • service
  • social justice
  • dignity and worth of the person
  • importance of human relationships
  • integrity
  • competence.

This constellation of core values reflects what is unique to the social work profession. Core values, and the principles that flow from them, must be balanced within the context and complexity of the human experience.

Purpose of the NASW Code of Ethics

Professional ethics are at the core of social work. The profession has an obligation to articulate its basic values, ethical principles, and ethical standards. The NASW Code of Ethics sets forth these values, principles, and standards to guide social workers’ conduct. The Code is relevant to all social workers and social work students, regardless of their professional functions, the settings in which they work, or the populations they serve.

The NASW Code of Ethics serves six purposes:

  1. The Code identifies core values on which social work’s mission is based.
  2. The Code summarizes broad ethical principles that reflect the profession’s core values and establishes a set of specific ethical standards that should be used to guide social work practice.
  3. The Code is designed to help social workers identify relevant considerations when professional obligations conflict or ethical uncertainties arise.
  4. The Code provides ethical standards to which the general public can hold the social work profession accountable.
  5. The Code socializes practitioners new to the field to social work’s mission, values, ethical principles, and ethical standards.
  6. The Code articulates standards that the social work profession itself can use to assess whether social workers have engaged in unethical conduct. NASW has formal procedures to adjudicate ethics complaints filed against its members.* In subscribing to this Code, social workers are required to cooperate in its implementation, participate in NASW adjudication proceedings, and abide by any NASW disciplinary rulings or sanctions based on it.

The Code offers a set of values, principles, and standards to guide decision making and conduct when ethical issues arise. It does not provide a set of rules that prescribe how social workers should act in all situations. Specific applications of the Code must take into account the context in which it is being considered and the possibility of conflicts among the Code‘s values, principles, and standards. Ethical responsibilities flow from all human relationships, from the personal and familial to the social and professional.

Further, the NASW Code of Ethics does not specify which values, principles, and standards are most important and ought to outweigh others in instances when they conflict. Reasonable differences of opinion can and do exist among social workers with respect to the ways in which values, ethical principles, and ethical standards should be rank ordered when they conflict. Ethical decision making in a given situation must apply the informed judgment of the individual social worker and should also consider how the issues would be judged in a peer review process where the ethical standards of the profession would be applied.

Ethical decision making is a process. There are many instances in social work where simple answers are not available to resolve complex ethical issues. Social workers should take into consideration all the values, principles, and standards in this Code that are relevant to any situation in which ethical judgment is warranted. Social workers’ decisions and actions should be consistent with the spirit as well as the letter of this Code.

In addition to this Code, there are many other sources of information about ethical thinking that may be useful. Social workers should consider ethical theory and principles generally, social work theory and research, laws, regulations, agency policies, and other relevant codes of ethics, recognizing that among codes of ethics social workers should consider the NASW Code of Ethics as their primary source. Social workers also should be aware of the impact on ethical decision making of their clients’ and their own personal values and cultural and religious beliefs and practices. They should be aware of any conflicts between personal and professional values and deal with them responsibly. For additional guidance social workers should consult the relevant literature on professional ethics and ethical decision making and seek appropriate consultation when faced with ethical dilemmas. This may involve consultation with an agency-based or social work organization’s ethics committee, a regulatory body, knowledgeable colleagues, supervisors, or legal counsel.

Instances may arise when social workers’ ethical obligations conflict with agency policies or relevant laws or regulations. When such conflicts occur, social workers must make a responsible effort to resolve the conflict in a manner that is consistent with the values, principles, and standards expressed in this Code. If a reasonable resolution of the conflict does not appear possible, social workers should seek proper consultation before making a decision.

The NASW Code of Ethics is to be used by NASW and by individuals, agencies, organizations, and bodies (such as licensing and regulatory boards, professional liability insurance providers, courts of law, agency boards of directors, government agencies, and other professional groups) that choose to adopt it or use it as a frame of reference. Violation of standards in this Code does not automatically imply legal liability or violation of the law. Such determination can only be made in the context of legal and judicial proceedings. Alleged violations of the Code would be subject to a peer review process. Such processes are generally separate from legal or administrative procedures and insulated from legal review or proceedings to allow the profession to counsel and discipline its own members.

A code of ethics cannot guarantee ethical behavior. Moreover, a code of ethics cannot resolve all ethical issues or disputes or capture the richness and complexity involved in striving to make responsible choices within a moral community. Rather, a code of ethics sets forth values, ethical principles, and ethical standards to which professionals aspire and by which their actions can be judged. Social workers’ ethical behavior should result from their personal commitment to engage in ethical practice. The NASW Code of Ethics reflects the commitment of all social workers to uphold the profession’s values and to act ethically. Principles and standards must be applied by individuals of good character who discern moral questions and, in good faith, seek to make reliable ethical judgments.

Ethical Principles

The following broad ethical principles are based on social work’s core values of service, social justice, dignity and worth of the person, importance of human relationships, integrity, and competence. These principles set forth ideals to which all social workers should aspire.

Value: Service

Ethical Principle: Social workers’ primary goal is to help people in need and to address social problems.
Social workers elevate service to others above self-interest. Social workers draw on their knowledge, values, and skills to help people in need and to address social problems. Social workers are encouraged to volunteer some portion of their professional skills with no expectation of significant financial return (pro bono service).

Value: Social Justice

Ethical Principle: Social workers challenge social injustice.
Social workers pursue social change, particularly with and on behalf of vulnerable and oppressed individuals and groups of people. Social workers’ social change efforts are focused primarily on issues of poverty, unemployment, discrimination, and other forms of social injustice. These activities seek to promote sensitivity to and knowledge about oppression and cultural and ethnic diversity. Social workers strive to ensure access to needed information, services, and resources; equality of opportunity; and meaningful participation in decision making for all people.

Value: Dignity and Worth of the Person

Ethical Principle: Social workers respect the inherent dignity and worth of the person.
Social workers treat each person in a caring and respectful fashion, mindful of individual differences and cultural and ethnic diversity. Social workers promote clients’ socially responsible self-determination. Social workers seek to enhance clients’ capacity and opportunity to change and to address their own needs. Social workers are cognizant of their dual responsibility to clients and to the broader society. They seek to resolve conflicts between clients’ interests and the broader society’s interests in a socially responsible manner consistent with the values, ethical principles, and ethical standards of the profession.

Value: Importance of Human Relationships

Ethical Principle: Social workers recognize the central importance of human relationships.
Social workers understand that relationships between and among people are an important vehicle for change. Social workers engage people as partners in the helping process. Social workers seek to strengthen relationships among people in a purposeful effort to promote, restore, maintain, and enhance the well-being of individuals, families, social groups, organizations, and communities.

Value: Integrity

Ethical Principle: Social workers behave in a trustworthy manner.
Social workers are continually aware of the profession’s mission, values, ethical principles, and ethical standards and practice in a manner consistent with them. Social workers act honestly and responsibly and promote ethical practices on the part of the organizations with which they are affiliated.

Value: Competence

Ethical Principle: Social workers practice within their areas of competence and develop and enhance their professional expertise.
Social workers continually strive to increase their professional knowledge and skills and to apply them in practice. Social workers should aspire to contribute to the knowledge base of the profession.

Ethical Standards

The following ethical standards are relevant to the professional activities of all social workers. These standards concern (1) social workers’ ethical responsibilities to clients, (2) social workers’ ethical responsibilities to colleagues, (3) social workers’ ethical responsibilities in practice settings, (4) social workers’ ethical responsibilities as professionals, (5) social workers’ ethical responsibilities to the social work profession, and (6) social workers’ ethical responsibilities to the broader society.

Some of the standards that follow are enforceable guidelines for professional conduct, and some are aspirational. The extent to which each standard is enforceable is a matter of professional judgment to be exercised by those responsible for reviewing alleged violations of ethical standards.

1. SOCIAL WORKERS’ ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO CLIENTS
1.01 Commitment to Clients

Social workers’ primary responsibility is to promote the well-being of clients. In general, clients’ interests are primary. However, social workers’ responsibility to the larger society or specific legal obligations may on limited occasions supersede the loyalty owed clients, and clients should be so advised. (Examples include when a social worker is required by law to report that a client has abused a child or has threatened to harm self or others.)

1.02 Self-Determination

Social workers respect and promote the right of clients to self-determination and assist clients in their efforts to identify and clarify their goals. Social workers may limit clients’ right to self-determination when, in the social workers’ professional judgment, clients’ actions or potential actions pose a serious, foreseeable, and imminent risk to themselves or others.

1.03 Informed Consent

(a) Social workers should provide services to clients only in the context of a professional relationship based, when appropriate, on valid informed consent. Social workers should use clear and understandable language to inform clients of the purpose of the services, risks related to the services, limits to services because of the requirements of a third-party payer, relevant costs, reasonable alternatives, clients’ right to refuse or withdraw consent, and the time frame covered by the consent. Social workers should provide clients with an opportunity to ask questions.

(b) In instances when clients are not literate or have difficulty understanding the primary language used in the practice setting, social workers should take steps to ensure clients’ comprehension. This may include providing clients with a detailed verbal explanation or arranging for a qualified interpreter or translator whenever possible.

(c) In instances when clients lack the capacity to provide informed consent, social workers should protect clients’ interests by seeking permission from an appropriate third party, informing clients consistent with the clients’ level of understanding. In such instances social workers should seek to ensure that the third party acts in a manner consistent with clients’ wishes and interests. Social workers should take reasonable steps to enhance such clients’ ability to give informed consent.

(d) In instances when clients are receiving services involuntarily, social workers should provide information about the nature and extent of services and about the extent of clients’ right to refuse service.

(e) Social workers who provide services via electronic media (such as computer, telephone, radio, and television) should inform recipients of the limitations and risks associated with such services.

(f) Social workers should obtain clients’ informed consent before audiotaping or videotaping clients or permitting observation of services to clients by a third party.

1.04 Competence

(a) Social workers should provide services and represent themselves as competent only within the boundaries of their education, training, license, certification, consultation received, supervised experience, or other relevant professional experience.

(b) Social workers should provide services in substantive areas or use intervention techniques or approaches that are new to them only after engaging in appropriate study, training, consultation, and supervision from people who are competent in those interventions or techniques.

(c) When generally recognized standards do not exist with respect to an emerging area of practice, social workers should exercise careful judgment and take responsible steps (including appropriate education, research, training, consultation, and supervision) to ensure the competence of their work and to protect clients from harm.

1.05 Cultural Competence and Social Diversity

(a) Social workers should understand culture and its function in human behavior and society, recognizing the strengths that exist in all cultures.

(b) Social workers should have a knowledge base of their clients’ cultures and be able to demonstrate competence in the provision of services that are sensitive to clients’ cultures and to differences among people and cultural groups.

(c) Social workers should obtain education about and seek to understand the nature of social diversity and oppression with respect to race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, marital status, political belief, religion, immigration status, and mental or physical disability.

1.06 Conflicts of Interest

(a) Social workers should be alert to and avoid conflicts of interest that interfere with the exercise of professional discretion and impartial judgment. Social workers should inform clients when a real or potential conflict of interest arises and take reasonable steps to resolve the issue in a manner that makes the clients’ interests primary and protects clients’ interests to the greatest extent possible. In some cases, protecting clients’ interests may require termination of the professional relationship with proper referral of the client.

(b) Social workers should not take unfair advantage of any professional relationship or exploit others to further their personal, religious, political, or business interests.

(c) Social workers should not engage in dual or multiple relationships with clients or former clients in which there is a risk of exploitation or potential harm to the client. In instances when dual or multiple relationships are unavoidable, social workers should take steps to protect clients and are responsible for setting clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries. (Dual or multiple relationships occur when social workers relate to clients in more than one relationship, whether professional, social, or business. Dual or multiple relationships can occur simultaneously or consecutively.)

(d) When social workers provide services to two or more people who have a relationship with each other (for example, couples, family members), social workers should clarify with all parties which individuals will be considered clients and the nature of social workers’ professional obligations to the various individuals who are receiving services. Social workers who anticipate a conflict of interest among the individuals receiving services or who anticipate having to perform in potentially conflicting roles (for example, when a social worker is asked to testify in a child custody dispute or divorce proceedings involving clients) should clarify their role with the parties involved and take appropriate action to minimize any conflict of interest.

1.07 Privacy and Confidentiality

(a) Social workers should respect clients’ right to privacy. Social workers should not solicit private information from clients unless it is essential to providing services or conducting social work evaluation or research. Once private information is shared, standards of confidentiality apply.

(b) Social workers may disclose confidential information when appropriate with valid consent from a client or a person legally authorized to consent on behalf of a client.

(c) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of all information obtained in the course of professional service, except for compelling professional reasons. The general expectation that social workers will keep information confidential does not apply when disclosure is necessary to prevent serious, foreseeable, and imminent harm to a client or other identifiable person. In all instances, social workers should disclose the least amount of confidential information necessary to achieve the desired purpose; only information that is directly relevant to the purpose for which the disclosure is made should be revealed.

(d) Social workers should inform clients, to the extent possible, about the disclosure of confidential information and the potential consequences, when feasible before the disclosure is made. This applies whether social workers disclose confidential information on the basis of a legal requirement or client consent.

(e) Social workers should discuss with clients and other interested parties the nature of confidentiality and limitations of clients’ right to confidentiality. Social workers should review with clients circumstances where confidential information may be requested and where disclosure of confidential information may be legally required. This discussion should occur as soon as possible in the social worker-client relationship and as needed throughout the course of the relationship.

(f) When social workers provide counseling services to families, couples, or groups, social workers should seek agreement among the parties involved concerning each individual’s right to confidentiality and obligation to preserve the confidentiality of information shared by others. Social workers should inform participants in family, couples, or group counseling that social workers cannot guarantee that all participants will honor such agreements.

(g) Social workers should inform clients involved in family, couples, marital, or group counseling of the social worker’s, employer’s, and agency’s policy concerning the social worker’s disclosure of confidential information among the parties involved in the counseling.

(h) Social workers should not disclose confidential information to third-party payers unless clients have authorized such disclosure.

(i) Social workers should not discuss confidential information in any setting unless privacy can be ensured. Social workers should not discuss confidential information in public or semipublic areas such as hallways, waiting rooms, elevators, and restaurants.

(j) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of clients during legal proceedings to the extent permitted by law. When a court of law or other legally authorized body orders social workers to disclose confidential or privileged information without a client’s consent and such disclosure could cause harm to the client, social workers should request that the court withdraw the order or limit the order as narrowly as possible or maintain the records under seal, unavailable for public inspection.

(k) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of clients when responding to requests from members of the media.

(l) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of clients’ written and electronic records and other sensitive information. Social workers should take reasonable steps to ensure that clients’ records are stored in a secure location and that clients’ records are not available to others who are not authorized to have access.

(m) Social workers should take precautions to ensure and maintain the confidentiality of information transmitted to other parties through the use of computers, electronic mail, facsimile machines, telephones and telephone answering machines, and other electronic or computer technology. Disclosure of identifying information should be avoided whenever possible.

(n) Social workers should transfer or dispose of clients’ records in a manner that protects clients’ confidentiality and is consistent with state statutes governing records and social work licensure.

(o) Social workers should take reasonable precautions to protect client confidentiality in the event of the social worker’s termination of practice, incapacitation, or death.

(p) Social workers should not disclose identifying information when discussing clients for teaching or training purposes unless the client has consented to disclosure of confidential information.

(q) Social workers should not disclose identifying information when discussing clients with consultants unless the client has consented to disclosure of confidential information or there is a compelling need for such disclosure.

(r) Social workers should protect the confidentiality of deceased clients consistent with the preceding standards.

1.08 Access to Records

(a) Social workers should provide clients with reasonable access to records concerning the clients. Social workers who are concerned that clients’ access to their records could cause serious misunderstanding or harm to the client should provide assistance in interpreting the records and consultation with the client regarding the records. Social workers should limit clients’ access to their records, or portions of their records, only in exceptional circumstances when there is compelling evidence that such access would cause serious harm to the client. Both clients’ requests and the rationale for withholding some or all of the record should be documented in clients’ files.

(b) When providing clients with access to their records, social workers should take steps to protect the confidentiality of other individuals identified or discussed in such records.

1.09 Sexual Relationships

(a) Social workers should under no circumstances engage in sexual activities or sexual contact with current clients, whether such contact is consensual or forced.

(b) Social workers should not engage in sexual activities or sexual contact with clients’ relatives or other individuals with whom clients maintain a close personal relationship when there is a risk of exploitation or potential harm to the client. Sexual activity or sexual contact with clients’ relatives or other individuals with whom clients maintain a personal relationship has the potential to be harmful to the client and may make it difficult for the social worker and client to maintain appropriate professional boundaries. Social workers—not their clients, their clients’ relatives, or other individuals with whom the client maintains a personal relationship—assume the full burden for setting clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries.

(c) Social workers should not engage in sexual activities or sexual contact with former clients because of the potential for harm to the client. If social workers engage in conduct contrary to this prohibition or claim that an exception to this prohibition is warranted because of extraordinary circumstances, it is social workers—not their clients—who assume the full burden of demonstrating that the former client has not been exploited, coerced, or manipulated, intentionally or unintentionally.

(d) Social workers should not provide clinical services to individuals with whom they have had a prior sexual relationship. Providing clinical services to a former sexual partner has the potential to be harmful to the individual and is likely to make it difficult for the social worker and individual to maintain appropriate professional boundaries.

1.10 Physical Contact

Social workers should not engage in physical contact with clients when there is a possibility of psychological harm to the client as a result of the contact (such as cradling or caressing clients). Social workers who engage in appropriate physical contact with clients are responsible for setting clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries that govern such physical contact.

1.11 Sexual Harassment

Social workers should not sexually harass clients. Sexual harassment includes sexual advances, sexual solicitation, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature.

1.12 Derogatory Language

Social workers should not use derogatory language in their written or verbal communications to or about clients. Social workers should use accurate and respectful language in all communications to and about clients.

1.13 Payment for Services

(a) When setting fees, social workers should ensure that the fees are fair, reasonable, and commensurate with the services performed. Consideration should be given to clients’ ability to pay.

(b) Social workers should avoid accepting goods or services from clients as payment for professional services. Bartering arrangements, particularly involving services, create the potential for conflicts of interest, exploitation, and inappropriate boundaries in social workers’ relationships with clients. Social workers should explore and may participate in bartering only in very limited circumstances when it can be demonstrated that such arrangements are an accepted practice among professionals in the local community, considered to be essential for the provision of services, negotiated without coercion, and entered into at the client’s initiative and with the client’s informed consent. Social workers who accept goods or services from clients as payment for professional services assume the full burden of demonstrating that this arrangement will not be detrimental to the client or the professional relationship.

(c) Social workers should not solicit a private fee or other remuneration for providing services to clients who are entitled to such available services through the social workers’ employer or agency.

1.14 Clients Who Lack Decision-Making Capacity

When social workers act on behalf of clients who lack the capacity to make informed decisions, social workers should take reasonable steps to safeguard the interests and rights of those clients.

1.15 Interruption of Services

Social workers should make reasonable efforts to ensure continuity of services in the event that services are interrupted by factors such as unavailability, relocation, illness, disability, or death.

1.16 Termination of Services

(a) Social workers should terminate services to clients and professional relationships with them when such services and
relationships are no longer required or no longer serve the clients’ needs or interests.

(b) Social workers should take reasonable steps to avoid abandoning clients who are still in need of services. Social workers should withdraw services precipitously only under unusual circumstances, giving careful consideration to all factors in the situation and taking care to minimize possible adverse effects. Social workers should assist in making appropriate arrangements for continuation of services when necessary.

(c) Social workers in fee-for-service settings may terminate services to clients who are not paying an overdue balance if the financial contractual arrangements have been made clear to the client, if the client does not pose an imminent danger to self or others, and if the clinical and other consequences of the current nonpayment have been addressed and discussed with the client.

(d) Social workers should not terminate services to pursue a social, financial, or sexual relationship with a client.

(e) Social workers who anticipate the termination or interruption of services to clients should notify clients promptly and seek the transfer, referral, or continuation of services in relation to the clients’ needs and preferences.

(f) Social workers who are leaving an employment setting should inform clients of appropriate options for the continuation of services and of the benefits and risks of the options.

2. SOCIAL WORKERS’ ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO COLLEAGUES
2.01 Respect

(a) Social workers should treat colleagues with respect and should represent accurately and fairly the qualifications, views, and obligations of colleagues.

(b) Social workers should avoid unwarranted negative criticism of colleagues in communications with clients or with other professionals. Unwarranted negative criticism may include demeaning comments that refer to colleagues’ level of competence or to individuals’ attributes such as race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, marital status, political belief, religion, immigration status, and mental or physical disability.

(c) Social workers should cooperate with social work colleagues and with colleagues of other professions when such cooperation serves the well-being of clients.

2.02 Confidentiality

Social workers should respect confidential information shared by colleagues in the course of their professional relationships and transactions. Social workers should ensure that such colleagues understand social workers’ obligation to respect confidentiality and any exceptions related to it.

2.03 Interdisciplinary Collaboration

(a) Social workers who are members of an interdisciplinary team should participate in and contribute to decisions that affect the well-being of clients by drawing on the perspectives, values, and experiences of the social work profession. Professional and ethical obligations of the interdisciplinary team as a whole and of its individual members should be clearly established.

(b) Social workers for whom a team decision raises ethical concerns should attempt to resolve the disagreement through appropriate channels. If the disagreement cannot be resolved, social workers should pursue other avenues to address their concerns consistent with client well-being.

2.04 Disputes Involving Colleagues

(a) Social workers should not take advantage of a dispute between a colleague and an employer to obtain a position or otherwise advance the social workers’ own interests.

(b) Social workers should not exploit clients in disputes with colleagues or engage clients in any inappropriate discussion of conflicts between social workers and their colleagues.

2.05 Consultation

(a) Social workers should seek the advice and counsel of colleagues whenever such consultation is in the best interests of clients.

(b) Social workers should keep themselves informed about colleagues’ areas of expertise and competencies. Social workers should seek consultation only from colleagues who have demonstrated knowledge, expertise, and competence related to the subject of the consultation.

(c) When consulting with colleagues about clients, social workers should disclose the least amount of information necessary to achieve the purposes of the consultation.

2.06 Referral for Services

(a) Social workers should refer clients to other professionals when the other professionals’ specialized knowledge or expertise is needed to serve clients fully or when social workers believe that they are not being effective or making reasonable progress with clients and that additional service is required.

(b) Social workers who refer clients to other professionals should take appropriate steps to facilitate an orderly transfer of responsibility. Social workers who refer clients to other professionals should disclose, with clients’ consent, all pertinent information to the new service providers.

(c) Social workers are prohibited from giving or receiving payment for a referral when no professional service is provided by the referring social worker.

2.07 Sexual Relationships

(a) Social workers who function as supervisors or educators should not engage in sexual activities or contact with supervisees, students, trainees, or other colleagues over whom they exercise professional authority.

(b) Social workers should avoid engaging in sexual relationships with colleagues when there is potential for a conflict of interest. Social workers who become involved in, or anticipate becoming involved in, a sexual relationship with a colleague have a duty to transfer professional responsibilities, when necessary, to avoid a conflict of interest.

2.08 Sexual Harassment

Social workers should not sexually harass supervisees, students, trainees, or colleagues. Sexual harassment includes sexual advances, sexual solicitation, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature.

2.09 Impairment of Colleagues

(a) Social workers who have direct knowledge of a social work colleague’s impairment that is due to personal problems, psychosocial distress, substance abuse, or mental health difficulties and that interferes
with practice effectiveness should consult with that colleague when feasible and assist the colleague in taking remedial action.

(b) Social workers who believe that a social work colleague’s impairment interferes with practice effectiveness and that the colleague has not taken adequate steps to address the impairment should take action through appropriate channels established by employers, agencies, NASW, licensing and regulatory bodies, and other professional organizations.

2.10 Incompetence of Colleagues

(a) Social workers who have direct knowledge of a social work colleague’s incompetence should consult with that colleague when feasible and assist the colleague in taking remedial action.

(b) Social workers who believe that a social work colleague is incompetent and has not taken adequate steps to address the incompetence should take action through appropriate channels established by employers, agencies, NASW, licensing and regulatory bodies, and other professional organizations.

2.11 Unethical Conduct of Colleagues

(a) Social workers should take adequate measures to discourage, prevent, expose, and correct the unethical conduct of colleagues.

(b) Social workers should be knowledgeable about established policies and procedures for handling concerns about colleagues’ unethical behavior. Social workers should be familiar with national, state, and local procedures for handling ethics complaints. These include policies and procedures created by NASW, licensing and regulatory bodies, employers, agencies, and other professional organizations.

(c) Social workers who believe that a colleague has acted unethically should seek resolution by discussing their concerns with the colleague when feasible and when such discussion is likely to be productive.

(d) When necessary, social workers who believe that a colleague has acted unethically should take action through appropriate formal channels (such as contacting a state licensing board or regulatory body, an NASW committee on inquiry, or other professional ethics committees).

(e) Social workers should defend and assist colleagues who are unjustly charged with unethical conduct.

3. SOCIAL WORKERS’ ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES IN PRACTICE SETTINGS
3.01 Supervision and Consultation

(a) Social workers who provide supervision or consultation should have the necessary knowledge and skill to supervise or consult appropriately and should do so only within their areas of knowledge and competence.

(b) Social workers who provide supervision or consultation are responsible for setting clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries.

(c) Social workers should not engage in any dual or multiple relationships with supervisees in which there is a risk of exploitation of or potential harm to the supervisee.

(d) Social workers who provide supervision should evaluate supervisees’ performance in a manner that is fair and respectful.

3.02 Education and Training

(a) Social workers who function as educators, field instructors for students, or trainers should provide instruction only within their areas of knowledge and competence and should provide instruction based on the most current information and knowledge available in the profession.

(b) Social workers who function as educators or field instructors for students should evaluate students’ performance in a manner that is fair and respectful.

(c) Social workers who function as educators or field instructors for students should take reasonable steps to ensure that clients are routinely informed when services are being provided by students.

(d) Social workers who function as educators or field instructors for students should not engage in any dual or multiple relationships with students in which there is a risk of exploitation or potential harm to the student. Social work educators and field instructors are responsible for setting clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries.

3.03 Performance Evaluation

Social workers who have responsibility for evaluating the performance of others should fulfill such responsibility in a fair and considerate manner and on the basis of clearly stated criteria.

3.04 Client Records

(a) Social workers should take reasonable steps to ensure that documentation in records is accurate and reflects the services provided.

(b) Social workers should include sufficient and timely documentation in records to facilitate the delivery of services and to ensure continuity of services provided to clients in the future.

(c) Social workers’ documentation should protect clients’ privacy to the extent that is possible and appropriate and should include only information that is directly relevant to the delivery of services.

(d) Social workers should store records following the termination of services to ensure reasonable future access. Records should be maintained for the number of years required by state statutes or relevant contracts.

3.05 Billing

Social workers should establish and maintain billing practices that accurately reflect the nature and extent of services provided and that identify who provided the service in the practice setting.

3.06 Client Transfer

(a) When an individual who is receiving services from another agency or colleague contacts a social worker for services, the social worker should carefully consider the client’s needs before agreeing to provide services. To minimize possible confusion and conflict, social workers should discuss with potential clients the nature of the clients’ current relationship with other service providers and the implications, including possible benefits or risks, of entering into a relationship with a new service provider.

(b) If a new client has been served by another agency or colleague, social workers should discuss with the client whether consultation with the previous service provider is in the client’s best interest.

3.07 Administration

(a) Social work administrators should advocate within and outside their agencies for adequate resources to meet clients’ needs.

(b) Social workers should advocate for resource allocation procedures that are open and fair. When not all clients’ needs can be met, an allocation procedure should be developed that is nondiscriminatory and based on appropriate and consistently applied principles.

(c) Social workers who are administrators should take reasonable steps to ensure that adequate agency or organizational resources are available to provide appropriate staff supervision.

(d) Social work administrators should take reasonable steps to ensure that the working environment for which they are responsible is consistent with and encourages compliance with the NASW Code of Ethics. Social work administrators should take reasonable steps to eliminate any conditions in their organizations that violate, interfere with, or discourage compliance with the Code.

3.08 Continuing Education and Staff Development

Social work administrators and supervisors should take reasonable steps to provide or arrange for continuing education and staff development for all staff for whom they are responsible. Continuing education and staff development should address current knowledge and emerging developments related to social work practice and ethics.

3.09 Commitments to Employers

(a) Social workers generally should adhere to commitments made to employers and employing organizations.

(b) Social workers should work to improve employing agencies’ policies and procedures and the efficiency and effectiveness of their services.

(c) Social workers should take reasonable steps to ensure that employers are aware of social workers’ ethical obligations as set forth in the NASW Code of Ethics and of the implications of those obligations for social work practice.

(d) Social workers should not allow an employing organization’s policies, procedures, regulations, or administrative orders to interfere with their ethical practice of social work. Social workers should take reasonable steps to ensure that their employing organizations’ practices are consistent with the NASW Code of Ethics.

(e) Social workers should act to prevent and eliminate discrimination in the employing organization’s work assignments and in its employment policies and practices.

(f) Social workers should accept employment or arrange student field placements only in organizations that exercise fair personnel practices.

(g) Social workers should be diligent stewards of the resources of their employing organizations, wisely conserving funds where appropriate and never misappropriating funds or using them for unintended purposes.

3.10 Labor-Management Disputes

(a) Social workers may engage in organized action, including the formation of and participation in labor unions, to improve services to clients and working conditions.

(b) The actions of social workers who are involved in labor-management disputes, job actions, or labor strikes should be guided by the profession’s values, ethical principles, and ethical standards. Reasonable differences of opinion exist among social workers concerning their primary obligation as professionals during an actual or threatened labor strike or job action. Social workers should carefully examine relevant issues and their possible impact on clients before deciding on a course of action.

4. SOCIAL WORKERS’ ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES AS PROFESSIONALS
4.01 Competence

(a) Social workers should accept responsibility or employment only on the basis of existing competence or the intention to acquire the necessary competence.

(b) Social workers should strive to become and remain proficient in professional practice and the performance of professional functions. Social workers should critically examine and keep current with emerging knowledge relevant to social work. Social workers should routinely review the professional literature and participate in continuing education relevant to social work practice and social work ethics.

(c) Social workers should base practice on recognized knowledge, including empirically based knowledge, relevant to social work and social work ethics.

4.02 Discrimination

Social workers should not practice, condone, facilitate, or collaborate with any form of discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, marital status, political belief, religion, immigration status, or mental or physical disability.

4.03 Private Conduct

Social workers should not permit their private conduct to interfere with their ability to fulfill their professional responsibilities.

4.04 Dishonesty, Fraud, and Deception

Social workers should not participate in, condone, or be associated with dishonesty, fraud, or deception.

4.05 Impairment

(a) Social workers should not allow their own personal problems, psychosocial distress, legal problems, substance abuse, or mental health difficulties to interfere with their professional judgment and performance or to jeopardize the best interests of people for whom they have a professional responsibility.

(b) Social workers whose personal problems, psychosocial distress, legal problems, substance abuse, or mental health difficulties interfere with their professional judgment and performance should immediately seek consultation and take appropriate remedial action by seeking professional help, making adjustments in workload, terminating practice, or taking any other steps necessary to protect clients and others.

4.06 Misrepresentation

(a) Social workers should make clear distinctions between statements made and actions engaged in as a private individual and as a representative of the social work profession, a professional social work organization, or the social worker’s employing agency.

(b) Social workers who speak on behalf of professional social work organizations should accurately represent the official and authorized positions of the organizations.

(c) Social workers should ensure that their representations to clients, agencies, and the public of professional qualifications, credentials, education, competence, affiliations, services provided, or results to be achieved are accurate. Social workers should claim only those relevant professional credentials they actually possess and take steps to correct any inaccuracies or misrepresentations of their credentials by others.

4.07 Solicitations

(a) Social workers should not engage in uninvited solicitation of potential clients who, because of their circumstances, are vulnerable to undue influence, manipulation, or coercion.

(b) Social workers should not engage in solicitation of testimonial endorsements (including solicitation of consent to use a client’s prior statement as a testimonial endorsement) from current clients or from other people who, because of their particular circumstances, are vulnerable to undue influence.

4.08 Acknowledging Credit

(a) Social workers should take responsibility and credit, including authorship credit, only for work they have actually performed and to which they have contributed.

(b) Social workers should honestly acknowledge the work of and the contributions made by others.

5. SOCIAL WORKERS’ ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO THE SOCIAL WORK PROFESSION
5.01 Integrity of the Profession

(a) Social workers should work toward the maintenance and promotion of high standards of practice.

(b) Social workers should uphold and advance the values, ethics, knowledge, and mission of the profession. Social workers should protect, enhance, and improve the integrity of the profession through appropriate study and research, active discussion, and responsible criticism of the profession.

(c) Social workers should contribute time and professional expertise to activities that promote respect for the value, integrity, and competence of the social work profession. These activities may include teaching, research, consultation, service, legislative testimony, presentations in the community, and participation in their professional organizations.

(d) Social workers should contribute to the knowledge base of social work and share with colleagues their knowledge related to practice, research, and ethics. Social workers should seek to contribute to the profession’s literature and to share their knowledge at professional meetings and conferences.

(e) Social workers should act to prevent the unauthorized and unqualified practice of social work.

5.02 Evaluation and Research

(a) Social workers should monitor and evaluate policies, the implementation of programs, and practice interventions.

(b) Social workers should promote and facilitate evaluation and research to contribute to the development of knowledge.

(c) Social workers should critically examine and keep current with emerging knowledge relevant to social work and fully use evaluation and research evidence in their professional practice.

(d) Social workers engaged in evaluation or research should carefully consider possible consequences and should follow guidelines developed for the protection of evaluation and research participants. Appropriate institutional review boards should be consulted.

(e) Social workers engaged in evaluation or research should obtain voluntary and written informed consent from participants, when appropriate, without any implied or actual deprivation or penalty for refusal to participate; without undue inducement to participate; and with due regard for participants’ well-being, privacy, and dignity. Informed consent should include information about the nature, extent, and duration of the participation requested and disclosure of the risks and benefits of participation in the research.

(f) When evaluation or research participants are incapable of giving informed consent, social workers should provide an appropriate explanation to the participants, obtain the participants’ assent to the extent they are able, and obtain written consent from an appropriate proxy.

(g) Social workers should never design or conduct evaluation or research that does not use consent procedures, such as certain forms of naturalistic observation and archival research, unless rigorous and responsible review of the research has found it to be justified because of its prospective scientific, educational, or applied value and unless equally effective alternative procedures that do not involve waiver of consent are not feasible.

(h) Social workers should inform participants of their right to withdraw from evaluation and research at any time without penalty.

(i) Social workers should take appropriate steps to ensure that participants in evaluation and research have access to appropriate supportive services.

(j) Social workers engaged in evaluation or research should protect participants from unwarranted physical or mental distress, harm, danger, or deprivation.

(k) Social workers engaged in the evaluation of services should discuss collected information only for professional purposes and only with people professionally concerned with this information.

(l) Social workers engaged in evaluation or research should ensure the anonymity or confidentiality of participants and of the data obtained from them. Social workers should inform participants of any limits of confidentiality, the measures that will be taken to ensure confidentiality, and when any records containing research data will be destroyed.

(m) Social workers who report evaluation and research results should protect participants’ confidentiality by omitting identifying information unless proper consent has been obtained authorizing disclosure.

(n) Social workers should report evaluation and research findings accurately. They should not fabricate or falsify results and should take steps to correct any errors later found in published data using standard publication methods.

(o) Social workers engaged in evaluation or research should be alert to and avoid conflicts of interest and dual relationships with participants, should inform participants when a real or potential conflict of interest arises, and should take steps to resolve the issue in a manner that makes participants’ interests primary.

(p) Social workers should educate themselves, their students, and their colleagues about responsible research practices.

6. SOCIAL WORKERS’ ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO THE BROADER SOCIETY
6.01 Social Welfare

Social workers should promote the general welfare of society, from local to global levels, and the development of people, their communities, and their environments. Social workers should advocate for living conditions conducive to the fulfillment of basic human needs and should promote social, economic, political, and cultural values and institutions that are compatible with the realization of social justice.

6.02 Public Participation

Social workers should facilitate informed participation by the public in shaping social policies and institutions.

6.03 Public Emergencies

Social workers should provide appropriate professional services in public emergencies to the greatest extent possible.

6.04 Social and Political Action

(a) Social workers should engage in social and political action that seeks to ensure that all people have equal access to the resources, employment, services, and opportunities they require to meet their basic human needs and to develop fully. Social workers should be aware of the impact of the political arena on practice and should advocate for changes in policy and legislation to improve social conditions in order to meet basic human needs and promote social justice.

(b) Social workers should act to expand choice and opportunity for all people, with special regard for vulnerable, disadvantaged, oppressed, and exploited people and groups.

(c) Social workers should promote conditions that encourage respect for cultural and social diversity within the United States and globally. Social workers should promote policies and practices that demonstrate respect for difference, support the expansion of cultural knowledge and resources, advocate for programs and institutions that demonstrate cultural competence, and promote policies that safeguard the rights of and confirm equity and social justice for all people.

(d) Social workers should act to prevent and eliminate domination of, exploitation of, and discrimination against any person, group, or class on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, marital status, political belief, religion, immigration status, or mental or physical disability.

Codigo de Etica
revisado por la Asamblea de Delegados de NASW de 2008

Preámbulo

La misión principal de la profesión de trabajador social es la de elevar el bienestar humano y ayudar a satisfacer las necesidades básicas humanas, con atención en particular a las necesidades y potenciación de la persona que es vulnerable, oprimida y que vive en la pobreza. Una característica histórica y que define la profesión del trabajo social es el enfoque de la profesión en el bienestar individual sobre un contexto social y en el bienestar de la sociedad. Es fundamental para el trabajo social la atención a las fuerzas del entorno que crean, contribuyen a, y solucionan los problemas de la vida.

Los trabajadores sociales promueven la justicia y el cambio social con y a pedido de los clientes. “Clientes” se utiliza con un sentido inclusivo para referirse a individuos, familias, grupos, organizaciones y comunidades. Los trabajadores sociales son sensibles a la diversidad cultural y étnica y luchan para terminar con la discriminación, la opresión, la pobreza y otras formas de injusticia social. Estas actividades pueden ser en la forma de práctica directa, organización comunitaria, supervisión, consulta, administración, apoyo, acción política y social, desarrollo e implementación de políticas, educación, e investigación y evaluación. Los trabajadores sociales buscan aumentar la capacidad de las personas para solucionar sus propias necesidades. Los trabajadores sociales también buscan promover la receptividad de las organizaciones, comunidades, y otras instituciones sociales a las necesidades individuales y a los problemas sociales.

La misión de la profesión del trabajo tiene sus raíces en un conjunto de valores esenciales. Estos valores esenciales, abrazados por los trabajadores sociales a lo largo de la historia de la profesión, son la base del propósito único y perspectiva del trabajo social:

  1. servicio
  2. justicia social
  3. dignidad y valor de la persona
  4. importancia de las relaciones humanas
  5. integridad
  6. competencia.

Esta constelación de valores esenciales refleja aquello que es exclusivo a la profesión del trabajador social. Los valores esenciales, y los principios que emanan de ellos, deben ser balanceados en el contexto y complejidad de la experiencia humana.

Propósito del Código de Ética de la NASW

La ética profesional se encuentra en el núcleo del trabajo social. La profesión tiene la obligación de articular sus valores básicos, principios éticos y normas éticas. El Código de Ética de la NASW expone estos valores, principios y normas a fin de guiar la conducta de los trabajadores sociales. El Código es relevante para todos los trabajadores sociales y estudiantes en el área de trabajo social, sin importar su función profesional, el entorno en el cual trabajan, o las poblaciones a las que sirven.

El Código de Ética de la NASW asiste en seis propósitos:

  1. El Código identifica valores esenciales en los cuales se basa la misión del trabajo social.
  2. El Código resume amplios principios éticos que reflejan los valores esenciales de la profesión y establece un conjunto de normas éticas específicas que deberían ser utilizadas para guiar la práctica de la profesión.
  3. El Código está diseñado para ayudar a los trabajadores sociales a identificar consideraciones relevantes cuando las obligaciones profesionales entran en conflicto o cuando surgen incertidumbres de naturaleza ética.
  4. El Código suministra normas éticas a partir de los cuales el público en general puede responsabilizar la profesión del trabajo social.
  5. El Código explica a los nuevos practicantes de la materia la misión del trabajo social, valores, principios éticos y normas éticas.
  6. El Código articula normas que la profesión del trabajo social puede utilizar para determinar si los trabajadores sociales han seguido una conducta no ética. La asociación NASW posee procedimientos formales para resolver en demandas en el área de ética presentadas contra sus miembros.* Al suscribir este Código, se requiere de que los trabajadores sociales cooperen en su implementación, participen en los procesos de adjudicación de la NASW, y se sometan a cualquier decisión disciplinaria o sanción de la NASW basada en él.

El Código ofrece un conjunto de valores, principios y normas para guiar la toma de decisiones y la conducta cuando surgen asuntos en el área de la ética. No suministra un conjunto de reglas que describen la forma en que los trabajadores sociales deben actuar en todas las situaciones. Las aplicaciones específicas del Código deberán tener en cuenta el contexto en el cuál deberá ser considerado y la posibilidad de que surjan conflictos entre los valores, principios y normas del Código. Las responsabilidades éticas emanan de toda relación humana, desde la personal y familiar a la social y profesional.

Más aún, el Código de Ética de la NASW no especifica que valores, principios y normas son los más importantes y deberían tener mayor peso con respecto a otros cuando estén en conflicto. Las diferencias razonables de opinión pueden y deben existir entre los trabajadores sociales respecto a las formas en que los valores, principios éticos y normas éticas deben ser tenidas en cuenta durante un conflicto. La toma de decisiones éticas en una situación dada debe usarse con el juicio informado del trabajador social individual y debería considerarse también, como el tema sería juzgado en un proceso de revisión de pares donde las normas éticas de la profesión serían aplicadas.

La toma de decisiones éticas es un proceso. Existen muchas instancias en el trabajo social donde no se dispone de simples respuestas para resolver complejas situaciones éticas. Los trabajadores sociales deberían tomar en consideración todos los valores, principios y normas de este Código que son relevantes para cualquier situación en la cuál el juicio ético se encuentre justificado. Las decisiones y acciones de los trabajadores sociales deberían ser consistentes con el espíritu y la letra de este Código.

Los trabajadores sociales deberían considerar que sumado a este Código, existen otras fuentes de información acerca de pensamiento ético que pueden llegar a ser útiles. Los trabajadores sociales deberán considerar la teoría ética y los principios generales, la teoría del trabajo social y la investigación, las leyes, las regulaciones, las políticas de l agencia, y otros códigos relevantes de ética, reconociendo que entre los códigos de ética los trabajadores sociales deberían considerar el Código de Ética de la NASW como su fuente principal. Los trabajadores sociales deberán ser conscientes del impacto en la toma de decisiones éticas de sus clientes y de sus propios valores personales y culturales; además de las creencias y prácticas religiosas. Deberían ser conscientes de cualquier conflicto entre valores personales y profesionales y manejarlos responsablemente. Para orientación adicional los trabajadores sociales deberían consultar la literatura relevante sobre ética profesional y toma de decisiones éticas y buscar una fuente de consulta apropiada cuando se vean enfrentados a dilemas éticos. Esto podría implicar la consulta con un comité de ética basado en una agencia o en una organización de trabajo social, un cuerpo regulatorio, colegas con conocimientos, supervisores, o consejo legal.

Pueden surgir instancias en las que las obligaciones éticas de los trabajadores sociales entren en conflicto con las políticas de las agencias o leyes relevantes o regulaciones. Cuando ocurran tales conflictos, los trabajadores sociales deberán realizar un esfuerzo responsable para resolver el conflicto de forma tal que sea consistente con los valores, principios y normas expresados en este Código. Si no se vislumbra una solución razonable al conflicto, los trabajadores sociales deberán buscar consejo adecuado antes de tomar una decisión.

El Código de Ética de la NASW debe ser utilizado por NASW y por individuos, agencias, organizaciones, y cuerpos (tales como oficinas de licencias y reguladoras, proveedores de seguros de responsabilidad profesional, tribunales de justicia, junta de directores de agencias, agencias gubernamentales y otros grupos profesionales) que eligieron adoptarlo o utilizarlo como marco de referencia. La violación de las normas de este Código no implica automáticamente una responsabilidad legal o una violación de la ley. Tal determinación sólo puede ser efectuada en el contexto de procedimientos legales y judiciales. Las presuntas violaciones al Código estarían sujetas a un procedimiento de revisión de los pares. Tales procesos son generalmente separados de procedimientos legales o administrativos y aislados de revisiones o procedimientos legales para permitir que la profesión aconseje y discipline a sus propios miembros.

Un código de ética no puede garantizar el comportamiento ético. Más aún, un código de ética no puede resolver todos los asuntos éticos o disputas o capturar la riqueza y complejidad involucrada en la puja por lograr elecciones responsables dentro de una comunidad moral. Más bien, un código de ética establece valores, principios éticos, y normas éticas a los que los profesionales aspiran y por los cuales sus acciones pueden ser juzgadas. El comportamiento ético de los trabajadores sociales debería surgir como consecuencia de su compromiso personal en involucrarse en el ejercicio profesional ético. El Código de Ética de la NASW refleja el compromiso de todos los trabajadores sociales de sostener los valores de la profesión y actuar éticamente. Los principios y las normas deben ser aplicados por los individuos de buen carácter que disciernen sobre cuestiones morales, de buena fe, a la búsqueda de juicios éticos confiables.

Principios Éticos

Los siguientes amplios principios éticos se basan en los valores esenciales del trabajo social de servicio, justicia social, dignidad y valor de la persona, la importancia de las relaciones humanas, integridad y competencia. Estos principios establecen los ideales a los que todos los trabajadores sociales deberían aspirar.

Valor: Servicio

Principio Ético: El objetivo principal del trabajador social es ayudar a las personas necesitadas y solucionar los problemas sociales.

Los trabajadores sociales elevan el servicio a otros por encima de su interés personal. Los trabajadores sociales recurren a sus conocimientos, valores y habilidades para ayudar a las personas necesitadas y solucionan los problemas sociales. Se alienta a los trabajadores sociales para que ofrezcan alguna parte de sus habilidades profesionales sin expectativa de una retribución financiera significativa (servicio pro bono).

Valor: Justicia Social

Principio Ético: Los trabajadores sociales desafían la injusticia social.

Los trabajadores sociales persiguen el cambio social, particularmente con y por cuenta de los individuos vulnerables y oprimidos y grupos de personas. Los esfuerzos de cambio de los trabajadores sociales se centran primariamente en temas de pobreza, desempleo, discriminación, y otras formas de injusticia social. Estas actividades buscan promover la sensibilidad hacia y el conocimiento de la opresión y la diversidad étnica y cultural. Los trabajadores sociales se esfuerzan para asegurar el acceso a la información necesaria, servicios y recursos; igualdad de oportunidades; y una participación significativa en la toma de decisiones para toda las personas.

Valor: Dignidad y Valor de la Persona

Principio Ético: Los trabajadores sociales respetan la dignidad inherente y el valor de la persona.

Los trabajadores sociales tratan a cada persona en un forma comprensiva y respetuosa, atentos a las diferencias individuales y a la diversidad étnica y cultural. Los trabajadores sociales promueven la propia determinación social de los clientes. Los trabajadores sociales buscan mejorar la capacidad y la oportunidad de sus clientes para el cambio y para que enfrenten sus propias necesidades. Los trabajadores sociales conocen de su responsabilidad dual hacia los clientes y hacia la sociedad. Ellos buscan resolver conflictos entre los intereses de los clientes y los intereses de la sociedad en una forma socialmente responsable consistente con los valores, principios éticos y normas éticas de la profesión.

Valor: Importancia de las Relaciones Humanas

Principio Ético: Los trabajadores sociales reconocen la importancia central de las relaciones humanas.

Los trabajadores sociales comprenden que las relaciones entre personas son un vehículo importante para el cambio. Los trabajadores sociales comprometen a las personas como socios en el proceso de ayuda. Los trabajadores sociales buscan fortalecer las relaciones entre personas en un decidido esfuerzo para promover, restaurar, mantener y realzar el bienestar de individuos, familias, grupos sociales, organizaciones, y comunidades.

Valor: Integridad

Principio Ético: Los trabajadores sociales se comportan en una forma digna de confianza.

Los trabajadores sociales están continuamente conscientes de la misión de su profesión, los valores, los principios éticos y las normas éticas y la práctica consistente de ellos. Los trabajadores sociales actúan honesta y responsablemente y decididos a promover prácticas éticas de parte de las organizaciones a las cuales se encuentran afiliados.

Valor: Competencia

Principio Ético: Los trabajadores sociales ejercen su profesión en su área de competencia y desarrollan y mejoran su experiencia profesional.

Los trabajadores sociales se esfuerzan continuamente para incrementar sus conocimientos profesionales y aplicarlos en el ejercicio de su profesión. Los trabajadores sociales deben aspirar a contribuir a la base del conocimiento de su profesión.

Normas Éticas

Las siguientes normas éticas son relevantes para la actividad profesional de todos los trabajadores sociales. Estas normas conciernen (1) las responsabilidades éticas de los trabajadores sociales hacia los clientes, (2) las responsabilidades éticas de los trabajadores sociales hacia sus colegas, (3) las responsabilidades éticas de los trabajadores sociales en el marco del ejercicio de su profesión, (4) las responsabilidades éticas de los trabajadores sociales como profesionales, (5) las responsabilidades éticas de los trabajadores sociales hacia la profesión del trabajo social, y (6) las responsabilidades éticas de los trabajadores sociales hacia la totalidad de la sociedad.

Algunas de las normas que siguen son lineamientos que se deben cumplir para la conducta profesional, y otros son aspiracionales. La medida en la que cada norma es ejecutable es una cuestión de juicio profesional a ser ejercido por aquellos responsables de analizar las violaciones presuntas de las normas de ética.

1. RESPONSABILIDADES ÉTICAS DE LOS TRABAJADORES SOCIALES HACIA LOS CLIENTES
1.01 Compromiso con los Clientes

La responsabilidad principal de los trabajadores sociales es la de promover el bienestar de los clientes. En general, los intereses de los clientes son la principal responsabilidad. De todas formas, la responsabilidad de los trabajadores sociales a una mayor parte de la sociedad u específicas obligaciones legales pueden en limitadas ocasiones suplantar la lealtad debida a los clientes, y los clientes deben ser notificados en consecuencia. (Los ejemplos incluyen aquellas ocasiones cuando se le requiere por ley a un trabajador social denunciar que un cliente ha abusado de un niño o ha amenazado realizar daño a sí mismo o a terceros).

1.02 Auto Determinación

Los trabajadores sociales respetan y promueven el derecho de los clientes a la auto determinación y en asistir a los clientes en sus esfuerzos para identificar y clarificar sus objetivos. Los trabajadores sociales pueden limitar el derecho a la auto determinación de los clientes, si a juicio profesional del trabajador social, el accionar de los clientes o su accionar potencial plantea un riesgo serio, previsible e inminente para sí mismos u otros.

1.03 Consentimiento Informado

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían suministrar servicios a los clientes sólo en el contexto de una relación profesional basada, cuando sea apropiado, en un consentimiento válido informado. Los trabajadores sociales deberían utilizar un lenguaje comprensible para informar a los clientes el propósito de sus servicios, los riesgos relacionados con sus servicios, los límites de sus servicios debido a los requerimientos de una tercera parte pagadora, los costos relevantes, las alternativas razonables, el derecho de los clientes a rechazar los servicios o a retirar el consentimiento, y el período de tiempo cubierto por el consentimiento. Los trabajadores sociales deben otorgar a los clientes una oportunidad para realizar preguntas.

(b) En aquellas instancias en las que los clientes no sepan leer y escribir o tengan dificultades para entender el lenguaje utilizado en el marco del ejercicio de la profesión, los trabajadores sociales deben seguir los pasos necesarios para asegurar la comprensión por parte de los clientes. Esto podría incluir suministrar a los clientes una detallada explicación verbal o realizar los arreglos para tener un intérprete calificado o traductor siempre que sea posible.

(c) En aquellas instancias donde los clientes carezcan de la capacidad de suministrar consentimiento informado, los trabajadores sociales deberían proteger los intereses de los clientes mediante la búsqueda del permiso de una tercera parte apropiada, informando a los clientes en el nivel de comprensión de los clientes. En tales instancias los trabajadores sociales deberían buscar asegurarse que esta tercera parte actúa en forma consistente con los deseos e intereses de los clientes. Los trabajadores sociales deberían tomar las medidas razonables para aumentar la habilidad de los clientes en brindar consentimiento informado.

(d) En aquellas instancias en las que los clientes se encuentran recibiendo servicios en forma involuntaria, los trabajadores sociales deberían suministrar información acerca de la naturaleza y el alcance de los servicios y acerca del derecho de los clientes a rechazar el servicio.

(e) Los trabajadores sociales que suministran servicios a través de medios electrónicos (tales como computadoras, teléfono, radio y televisión) deberían informar a los receptores de las limitaciones y riesgos asociados con este tipo de servicios.

(f) Los trabajadores sociales deberían obtener el consentimiento informado de los clientes antes de grabar o filmar a los clientes o permitir la observación de los servicios a los clientes por una tercera parte.

1.04 Competencia

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían suministrar servicios y representarse a sí mismos como competentes sólo dentro de los límites de su educación, entrenamiento, licencia, certificación, consultas recibidas, experiencia supervisada, u otras relevantes experiencias profesionales.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales deberían suministrar servicios en áreas sustantivas o utilizar técnicas de intervención o enfoques que son novedosos para ellos sólo después de involucrarse en el apropiado estudio, entrenamiento, consulta y supervisión de personas que son competentes en ese tipo de intervenciones o técnicas.

(c) Cuando no existan normas generalmente reconocidas en un área emergente del ejercicio profesional, los trabajadores sociales deberán ejercitar un juicio cuidadoso y tomar los pasos responsables (incluyendo la educación, investigación, entrenamiento, consultas y supervisión apropiadas) para asegurar la competencia de su trabajo y proteger a sus clientes del daño posible.

1.05 Competencia Cultural y Diversidad Social

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían entender la cultura y su función en el comportamiento humano y de la sociedad, reconociendo las fortalezas que existen en todas las culturas.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales deberían tener el conocimiento basado en la cultura de sus clientes y ser capaces de demostrar su competencia en la provisión de servicios que son sensibles a la cultura de sus clientes y las diferencias entre las personas y grupos culturales.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales deberían obtener educación acerca de y comprensión de la naturaleza de la diversidad social y opresión respecto de la raza, etnia, origen nacional, color, condición migratoria, sexo, orientación sexual, identidad de género, edad, status marital, creencia política, religión, y discapacidad mental o física.

1.06 Conflicto de Intereses

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían estar alertas a y evitar conflictos de intereses que interfieran con el ejercicio de la discreción profesional y el juicio imparcial. Los trabajadores sociales deberían informar a los clientes cuando surjan conflictos de intereses reales o potenciales y tomar las medidas razonables para resolver la cuestión de forma de priorizar los intereses de los clientes y proteger los intereses de los clientes en la mayor medida posible. En algunos casos, la protección de los intereses de los clientes podría llegar a requerir la finalización de la relación profesional con la adecuada derivación del cliente.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían sacar ningún tipo de ventaja injusta basada en una relación profesional o explotar a otros en favor de sus intereses personales, religiosos, políticos o de negocios.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían involucrarse en relaciones duales o múltiples con clientes o clientes pasados en donde exista riesgo de explotación o daño potencial al cliente. En las instancias en que las relaciones duales o múltiples sean inevitables, los trabajadores sociales deberán tomar las medidas para proteger a los clientes y son responsables por establecer límites claros, apropiados y culturalmente sensibles. (Las relaciones duales o múltiples ocurren cuando los trabajadores sociales se relacionan con los clientes en más de una forma de relación, sea profesional, social o de negocios. Las relaciones duales o múltiples pueden ocurrir en forma simultánea o consecutiva.)

(d) Cuando los trabajadores sociales suministran servicios a dos o más clientes que tienen relaciones entre ellos (por ejemplo, parejas, familiares), los trabajadores sociales deberán aclarar a todas las partes que individuos serán considerados clientes y la naturaleza de las obligaciones con los individuos que se encuentran recibiendo los servicios. Los trabajadores sociales que anticipan un conflicto de intereses entre los individuos que se encuentran recibiendo los servicios o que anticipan que deberán desempeñarse en roles conflictivos (por ejemplo, cuando se le solicita a un trabajador social que testifique en la disputa por la custodia de un niño, o en un proceso de divorcio que involucra a los clientes) deberán aclarar su función con las partes involucradas y tomar las acciones necesarias para minimizar cualquier conflicto de intereses.

1.07 Privacidad y Confidencialidad

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberán respetar el derecho de los clientes a la privacidad. Los trabajadores sociales no deberían solicitar información privada a los clientes salvo que sea esencial para suministrar servicios o conducir la evaluación o investigación en materia de trabajo social. Una vez que la información privada es compartida, se aplican las normas de confidencialidad.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales podrán revelar información confidencial cuando sea apropiado con el consentimiento válido por parte del cliente o una persona legalmente autorizada por parte del cliente.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales deberían proteger la confidencialidad de toda la información obtenida en el curso de un servicio profesional, a excepción que existan razones profesionales de peso. La expectativa general de que los trabajadores sociales mantendrán el carácter confidencial de la información no es aplicable cuando revelar la información es necesario para prevenir un daño serio, previsible e inminente a un cliente o a otra persona identificable. En todas las instancias, los trabajadores sociales deberían revelar la menor cantidad de información confidencial posible necesaria para lograr el propósito deseado; sólo la información que es directamente relevante al propósito deseado; sólo la información directamente relevante al propósito para la que es revelada debe ser dada a conocer.

(d) Los trabajadores sociales deberían informar a los clientes, en la medida de lo posible, acerca de la revelación de la información confidencial y las potenciales consecuencias, cuando sea posible antes de que la información sea revelada. Esto se aplica tanto cuando los trabajadores sociales revelan información confidencial debido a un requerimiento legal o por el consentimiento del cliente.

(e) Los trabajadores sociales deberían discutir con sus clientes y otras partes interesadas la naturaleza de la confidencialidad y las limitaciones de sus clientes al derecho de la confidencialidad. Los trabajadores sociales deberían revisar con los clientes las circunstancias en las cuales puede llegar a solicitarse información confidencial y la revelación de la información confidencial puede ser legalmente requerida. La discusión debe ser realizada tan pronto como sea posible en la relación trabajador social-cliente y cuando sea necesario en el curso de la relación.

(f) Cuando los trabajadores sociales suministren servicios de asesoramiento a familias, parejas, o grupos, los trabajadores sociales deberían buscar el acuerdo entre las partes involucradas en relación al derecho de cada individuo a la confidencialidad y la obligación de preservar la confidencialidad de la información compartida por otros. Los trabajadores sociales deberían informar a los participantes en familias, parejas, o grupos aconsejados que los trabajadores sociales no podrán garantizar que todos los participantes honren tal tipo de acuerdos.

(g) Los trabajadores sociales deberían informar a lo clientes involucrados en una familia, pareja, matrimonio, o grupo de asesoramiento del trabajador social, del empleador y de la agencia la política concerniente a la revelación de información confidencial entre las partes involucradas en el asesoramiento.

(h) Los trabajadores sociales no deberán revelar información a terceras partes pagadoras a menos que los clientes los hubieran autorizado a revelar tal información.

(i) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían discutir sobre información confidencial en ningún entorno a menos que la privacidad se encuentre garantizada. Los trabajadores sociales no deberían discutir la información en áreas públicas o semipúblicas tales como vestíbulos, salas de espera, ascensores y restaurantes.

(j) Los trabajadores sociales deberían proteger la confidencialidad de los clientes durante los procedimientos legales hasta el límite permitido por la ley. Cuando un tribunal de justicia u otro cuerpo legalmente autorizado ordena a un trabajador social revelar información confidencial o privilegiada sin el consentimiento del cliente y esta revelación podría causar daño al cliente, el trabajador social podría solicitar a la corte que retire o limite la orden tanto como le sea posible o mantenga los registros bajo sello, no disponible para la inspección pública.

(k) Los trabajadores sociales deberían proteger la confidencialidad de los clientes cuando respondan interrogantes por parte de miembros de la prensa.

(l) Los trabajadores sociales deberían proteger la confidencialidad de los registros escritos y electrónicos y toda otra información sensible de los clientes. Los trabajadores sociales deberán tomar medidas razonables para asegurarse que los registros de los clientes queden almacenados en un lugar seguro y de que dichos registros no queden al alcance de aquellos que no poseen autorización para tener acceso a ellos.

(m) Los trabajadores sociales deberían tomar las precauciones para asegurarse y mantener la confidencialidad de la información transmitida a terceras partes a través del uso de computadoras, correo electrónico, faxes, teléfonos y contestadores automáticos, y otros medios de tecnología informática o electrónica. La revelación de información identificatoria deberá ser evitada siempre que sea posible.

(n) Los trabajadores sociales deberán transferir o disponer de los registros de los clientes en una forma que proteja la confidencialidad de los clientes y que sea consistente con lo expresado por la regulación estatal y la licencia de trabajador social.

(o) Los trabajadores sociales deberán tomar precauciones razonables para proteger la confidencialidad de los clientes en el evento de finalización del ejercicio profesional por parte del trabajador social, su incapacidad o muerte.

(p) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían revelar información identificatoria mientras discuten acerca de sus clientes con propósitos de enseñanza o entrenamiento a menos que el cliente hubiera consentido revelar información confidencial.

1.08 Acceso a los Registros

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deben suministrar a los clientes con acceso razonable a los registros sobre ellos. Los trabajadores sociales que están preocupados de que el acceso de sus clientes a los registros cause serios malentendidos o daño al cliente deberían suministrar asistencia al cliente en la interpretación de los registros y asesoramiento al cliente en relación a los registros. Los trabajadores sociales deberían limitar el acceso a los registros, o porciones de los registros de los clientes cuando exista fuerte evidencia de que dicho acceso podría causar serios daños a sus clientes. Tanto las solicitudes de acceso de los clientes como la racionalidad de la retención de partes del registro o el registro completo deberían encontrarse documentadas en los archivos del cliente.

(b) Cuando se le suministre acceso a los registros, los trabajadores sociales deberían tomar las medidas para proteger la confidencialidad de otros individuos identificados o mencionados en dichos registros.

1.09 Relaciones Sexuales

(a) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían bajo ninguna circunstancia involucrarse en actividades sexuales o contactos sexuales con sus clientes actuales, ya sea que dicho contacto sea consentido o forzado.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían involucrarse en actividades sexuales o contactos sexuales con familiares de sus clientes u otros individuos con los cuáles los clientes mantengan una relación personal cercana donde exista el riesgo de explotación o daño potencial al cliente. La actividad sexual o el contacto sexual con los familiares del cliente u otros individuos con los cuales el cliente mantiene una relación personal, tiene el potencial de ser dañino para el cliente y tornaría difícil al trabajador social y al cliente mantener los límites profesionales apropiados. Los trabajadores sociales – no sus clientes, ni los familiares de sus clientes, u otros individuos con los cuales el cliente mantenga una relación personal – asumen la carga total por establecer límites claros, apropiados y culturalmente sensibles.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían involucrarse en actividades sexuales o contactos sexuales con clientes pasados debido al potencial de causar daño al cliente. Si el trabajador social se involucra en una conducta contraria a esta prohibición o declara que una excepción a esta prohibición se encuentra garantizada por circunstancias extraordinarias, son los trabajadores sociales –no sus clientes– los que asumen la carga total de demostrar que el cliente pasado no ha sido explotado, obligado o manipulado, en forma intencional o sin intención.

(d) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían suministrar servicios clínicos a individuos con los cuales hayan mantenido previamente relaciones sexuales. Suministrar servicios clínicos a un compañero sexual anterior tiene el potencial de ser dañino para el individuo y es probable que haga difícil para el trabajador social y el individuo mantener límites profesionales apropiados.

1.10 Contacto Físico

Los trabajadores sociales no deberían involucrarse en contacto físico con sus clientes cuando existe la posibilidad de daño psicológico al cliente como resultado del contacto (tales como acunar o acariciar clientes). Los trabajadores sociales que se involucran en un apropiado contacto físico con los clientes son responsables de establecer límites claros, apropiados y culturalmente sensibles que rijan tales contactos físicos.

1.11 Acoso Sexual

Los trabajadores sociales no deberían acosar sexualmente a los clientes. El acoso sexual incluye avances sexuales, pedido sexual, solicitud de favores sexuales, y otra conducta verbal o física de naturaleza sexual.

1.12 Lenguaje Despectivo

Los trabajadores sociales no deberían utilizar lenguaje despectivo en sus comunicaciones escritas o verbales hacia o acerca de los clientes. Los trabajadores sociales deberían utilizar un lenguaje exacto y respetuoso en todas las comunicaciones hacia y de los clientes.

1.13 Pago por los Servicios

(a) Al establecer honorarios, los trabajadores sociales deberían asegurarse que los honorarios son justos, razonables, y proporcionados a los servicios prestados. También debe prestarse consideración a la capacidad de los clientes para pagar.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales deberían evitar aceptar bienes o servicios de los clientes como pago por los servicios profesionales prestados. Los arreglos de trueque, particularmente aquellos que involucran servicios, crean el potencial para conflicto de intereses, explotación, y límites inapropiados para la relación del trabajador social con sus clientes. Los trabajadores sociales deberían explorar y participar en operaciones trueque en muy limitadas circunstancias en las que puede ser demostrado que tales arreglos son un procedimiento aceptado entre los profesionales de la comunidad local, considerada esencial para el suministro de servicios, negociado sin coacción, y a la cual se llega por iniciativa del cliente y con el consentimiento informado del cliente. Los trabajadores sociales que aceptan bienes o servicios de los clientes como pago por sus servicios profesionales asumen la carga total de demostrar que este arreglo no fue realizado en detrimento del cliente o de la relación profesional.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían solicitar un honorario privado u otro tipo de remuneración por suministrar servicios a los clientes que disponen de esos servicios a través del empleador del trabajador social o agencia.

1.14 Clientes que Carecen de la Capacidad para Tomar Decisiones

Cuando los trabajadores sociales actúan por cuenta de clientes que carecen de la capacidad para tomar decisiones informadas, los trabajadores sociales deberán tomar las medidas razonables para salvaguardar los intereses y derechos de esos clientes.

1.15 Interrupción de Servicios

Los trabajadores sociales deberían realizar esfuerzos razonables para asegurar la continuidad de servicios en el evento de que los servicios sean interrumpidos por factores tales como indisponibilidad, mudanza, enfermedad, discapacidad o muerte.

1.16 Finalización de los Servicios

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían concluir los servicios y las relaciones profesionales con sus clientes cuando esos servicios y relaciones ya no sean requeridas o no sirvan más a las necesidades o intereses de los clientes.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales deberían tomar las medidas necesarias para evitar abandonar a los clientes que todavía requieran de sus servicios. Los trabajadores sociales deberían retirar precipitadamente sus servicios sólo ante circunstancias inusuales, prestándole cuidadosa atención a todos los factores de la situación y cuidando de minimizar los posibles efectos adversos. Los trabajadores sociales deberían contribuir a realizar los arreglos apropiados para la continuidad de los servicios cuando fuere necesario.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales que se encuentren percibiendo honorarios por servicios a clientes que no se encuentren pagando los servicios ya prestados podrían terminar sus servicios si el acuerdo financiero contractual lo hubiera establecido al cliente claramente, si el cliente no representa un peligro inminente para sí mismo o para terceros, y si las consecuencias clínicas y de otro tipo del no cumplimiento del pago hubieran sido conversadas y discutidas con el cliente.

(d) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían finalizar los servicios para lograr una relación social, financiera o sexual con un cliente.

(e) Los trabajadores sociales que esperan finalizar o interrumpir los servicios a los clientes deberían notificarlos sin demora y buscar la transferencia, derivación o continuación de los servicios en relación a las necesidades y preferencias de los clientes.

(f) Los trabajadores sociales que se encuentran dejando un entorno de trabajo deberían informar a los clientes sobre las opciones adecuadas para la continuación de los servicios y los beneficios y los riesgos asociados a ellas.

2. LAS RESPONSABILIDADES ÉTICAS DE LOS TRABAJADORES SOCIALES HACIA SUS COLEGAS
2.01 Respeto

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían tratar a sus colegas con respeto y representar en forma precisa y justa las calificaciones, opiniones y obligaciones de sus colegas.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales deberían evitar críticas negativas sin fundamento a sus colegas en comunicaciones a sus clientes o con otros profesionales. Las críticas sin fundamento podrían incluir comentarios humillantes que hacen referencia al nivel de competencia de sus colegas o a atributos de los individuos tales como raza, etnia, nacionalidad, color, condición migratoria, sexo, orientación sexual, identidad o expresión de género, edad, estado civil, creencia política, religión y discapacidad física o mental.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales deberían cooperar con colegas del trabajo social y colegas de otras profesiones cuando dicha cooperación sirva al bienestar de los clientes.

2.02 Confidencialidad

Los trabajadores sociales deberían respetar la información confidencial compartida con colegas en el curso de las relaciones y transacciones profesionales. Los trabajadores sociales deberían asegurarse que sus colegas comprenden las obligaciones del trabajador social en relación a la confidencialidad y todas las excepciones relativas a ella.

2.03 Colaboración Interdisciplinaria

(a) Los trabajadores sociales que son miembros de un equipo interdisciplinario deberían participar y contribuir en las decisiones que afecten el bienestar de los clientes precisando las perspectivas, valores y experiencias de la profesión del trabajo social. Las obligaciones profesionales y éticas del equipo interdisciplinario como un todo y de cada uno de sus miembros deberían estar claramente establecidas.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales para quienes la decisión de un equipo les generen preocupaciones éticas deberían intentar resolver los desacuerdos a través de los canales apropiados. Si el desacuerdo no puede ser resuelto, los trabajadores sociales deberían buscar otras vías para dirigir sus preocupaciones consistentes con el bienestar de sus clientes.

2.04 Disputas que Involucran a Colegas

(a) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían tomar ventaja de las disputas entre un colega y un empleador para obtener una posición u otro tipo de avance en el interés propio del trabajador social.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían explotar a sus clientes en disputas con colegas o involucrar a los clientes en ninguna discusión inapropiada de conflictos entre los trabajadores sociales y sus colegas.

2.05 Consultas

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían buscar el asesoramiento y consejo de sus colegas siempre que tales consultas sirva a los mejores intereses de sus clientes.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales deberían mantenerse informados sobre las áreas de experiencia y competencia de sus colegas. Los trabajadores sociales deberían buscar consultar sólo a aquellos colegas que han demostrado conocimiento, experiencia y competencia en áreas relativas a la consulta.

(c) Al consultar a los colegas acerca de sus clientes, los trabajadores sociales deberían tratar de exponer la menor cantidad de información necesaria para los propósitos de la consulta.

2.06 Derivación de Servicios

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían derivar clientes a otros profesionales cuando el conocimiento especializado de esos profesionales o su experiencia sea necesario para servir a sus clientes plenamente o cuando los trabajadores sociales crean que no se encuentran siendo efectivos o haciendo progresos razonables con sus clientes y que ese servicio adicional es requerido.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales que derivan clientes a otros profesionales deberían seguir los pasos necesarios para facilitar una transferencia ordenada de responsabilidad. Los trabajadores sociales que derivan clientes a otros profesionales deberían revelar, con el consentimiento del cliente, toda la información pertinente al nuevo proveedor del servicio.

(c) Se prohíbe a los trabajadores sociales dar o recibir pagos por la derivación de un cliente cuando ningún servicio es prestado por el trabajador social que efectúa la derivación.

2.07 Relaciones Sexuales

(a) Los trabajadores sociales que funcionan como supervisores o educadores no deberían involucrarse en actividades o contactos sexuales con supervisados, estudiantes, pasantes u otros colegas sobre los cuales ejercen autoridad profesional.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales deberían evitar involucrarse en relaciones sexuales con colegas cuando exista la posibilidad de conflicto de intereses. Los trabajadores sociales que se involucran en, o esperan involucrarse en relaciones sexuales con un colega tienen el deber de transferir las responsabilidades profesionales, cuando sea necesario, para evitar conflicto de intereses.

2.08 Acoso Sexual

Los trabajadores sociales no deberían acosar sexualmente a los supervisados, estudiantes, pasantes o colegas. El acoso sexual incluye avances sexuales, pedidos de naturaleza sexual, solicitud de favores sexuales, y otras conductas físicas o verbales de naturaleza sexual.

2.09 Impedimento de Colegas

(a) Los trabajadores sociales que tengan un conocimiento directo del impedimento de un colega debido a problemas personales, estrés psicológico, abuso de substancias, o dificultades de salud mental y que interfiere con la efectividad del ejercicio profesional del colega debería consultar con ese colega y asistir al colega a buscar acciones que remedien dicha situación.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales que creen que el impedimento de un colega de trabajo social se encuentra interfiriendo con la práctica efectiva y que el colega no ha tomado los pasos necesarios para solucionar el impedimento, debería accionar a través de los canales apropiados establecidos por los empleadores, agencias, NASW, organismos de licencias y reguladores y otras organizaciones profesionales.

2.10 Incompetencia de Colegas

(a) Los trabajadores sociales que tengan conocimiento directo de la incompetencia de un colega en el campo del trabajo social deberían realizar consultas con ese colega y asistirlo para que tome acciones que remedien dicha situación.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales que crean que un colega en el campo del trabajo social es incompetente y que no ha tomado los pasos necesarios para subsanar dicha incompetencia deberá accionar a través de los canales apropiados establecidos por los empleadores, agencias, NASW, oficinas de licencias y reguladores y otras organizaciones profesionales.

2.11 Conducta No Ética de Colegas

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían tomar las medidas adecuadas para desalentar, prevenir, exponer y corregir la conducta no ética de sus colegas.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales deberían conocer las políticas y procedimientos establecidos para el manejo de cuestiones acerca del comportamiento no ético de los colegas. Los trabajadores sociales deberían estar familiarizados con las políticas y procedimientos nacionales, estaduales y locales para el manejo de los comportamientos no éticos de los colegas. Estos incluyen las políticas y procedimientos creados por la NASW, los cuerpos de licencias y reguladores, empleadores, agencias y organizaciones profesionales.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales que creen que un colega ha actuado de una forma no ética deberían buscar la resolución mediante la discusión de su preocupación con el colega cuando sea posible y siempre que esa discusión fuese probablemente productiva.

(d) Cuando fuera necesario, los trabajadores sociales que consideren que un colega ha actuado de una manera no ética deberían seguir cursos de acción a través de los canales formales apropiados (tales como contactar a las juntas de licencias o reguladoras, un comité o jurado de la NASW, u otros comités profesionales de ética).

(e) Los trabajadores sociales deberían defender y asistir a los colegas que se encuentran injustamente acusados de conducta no ética.

3. LAS RESPONSABILIDADES ÉTICAS DE LOS TRABAJADORES SOCIALES EN EL ENTORNO DE SU EJERCICIO PROFESIONAL
3.01 Supervisión y Consulta

(a) Los trabajadores sociales que suministren supervisión o consultoría deberían tener el conocimiento necesario y las habilidades de supervisar y asesorar apropiadamente y hacerlo sólo en aquellas que son sus áreas de conocimiento y especialidad.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales que suministran supervisión y asesoramiento son responsables de establecer límites claros, apropiados y culturalmente sensibles.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían involucrarse en ningún tipo de relaciones duales o múltiples con los supervisados donde exista el riesgo de explotación o de daño potencial al supervisado.

(d) Los trabajadores sociales que suministran supervisión deberían evaluar el comportamiento de los supervisados de forma que fuera justa y respetuosa.

3.02 Educación y Entrenamiento

(a) Los trabajadores sociales que funcionan como educadores, instructores de campo para estudiantes, o entrenadores sólo deberían suministrar instrucción dentro de sus áreas de conocimiento y competencia y deberían suministrar instrucción basada en la más reciente información y conocimiento disponible en la profesión.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales que funcionan como educadores o instructores de campo para estudiantes deberían evaluar el comportamiento de los estudiantes de una forma que fuera justa y respetuosa.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales que funcionan como educadores o instructores de campo para estudiantes deberían tomar las medidas apropiadas para asegurarse que sus clientes son rutinariamente informados cuando los servicios están siendo prestados por estudiantes.

(d) Los trabajadores sociales que se desempeñan como educadores o instructores de campo para estudiantes no deberían involucrarse en relaciones duales o múltiples con los estudiantes en las que hubiera riesgo de explotación o daño potencial para el estudiante. Los educadores del trabajo social y los instructores de campo son responsables por el establecimiento de límites claros, apropiados y culturalmente sensibles.

3.03 Evaluación del Comportamiento

Los trabajadores sociales que tienen la responsabilidad de evaluar el comportamiento de otros deben cumplir esa responsabilidad de una manera justa y considerada y sobre la base de criterios claramente establecidos.

3.04 Registros de los Clientes

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían tomar las medidas necesarias para asegurarse que la documentación de los registros es exacta y refleja los servicios suministrados.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales deberían incluir documentación suficiente y oportuna para facilitar la entrega de los servicios y asegurar la continuidad de los servicios suministrados al cliente en el futuro.

(c) La documentación de los trabajadores sociales debería proteger la privacidad de los clientes hasta el punto que sea posible y apropiado y debería incluir sólo la información que es directamente relevante para la transferencia de los servicios.

(d) Los trabajadores sociales deberían almacenar los registros luego de la finalización de los servicios para asegurar un razonable acceso futuro. Los registros deberían ser mantenidos el número de años establecido por las leyes del estado o los contratos relevantes.

3.05 Facturación

Los trabajadores sociales deberían establecer y mantener procesos de facturación que reflejen exactamente la naturaleza y la extensión de los servicios suministrados y que identifican a aquellos que suministraron los servicios en el entorno del ejercicio profesional.

3.06 Transferencia de Clientes

(a) Cuando un individuo que se encuentra recibiendo servicios de otra agencia o colega contrata a un trabajador social por sus servicios, el trabajador social debería considerar cuidadosamente las necesidades del cliente antes de acordar suministrar los servicios. Para minimizar la posible confusión y conflicto, el trabajador social debería discutir con los potenciales clientes la naturaleza de la relación actual de los clientes con otros proveedores de servicios y las implicaciones, incluyendo posibles beneficios y riesgos, de ingresar en una nueva relación con un nuevo proveedor de servicios.

(b) Si un nuevo cliente ha sido servido por otra agencia o colega, los trabajadores sociales deberían discutir con el cliente si la consulta con el anterior proveedor del servicio ha sido en el mejor interés del cliente.

3.07 Administración

(a) Los administradores de trabajo social deberían defender dentro y fuera de sus agencias los recursos adecuados para hacer frente a las necesidades de sus clientes.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales deberían defender los procedimientos de asignación de recursos que son abiertos y justos. Cuando no todas las necesidades de los clientes pueden ser satisfechas, debería ser desarrollado un procedimiento de asignación de recursos que no fuera discriminatorio y que se basara en principios apropiados y consistentes.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales que son administradores deberían tomar las medidas necesarias para asegurar que se cuentan con los recursos de agencia y organizacionales adecuados o que están disponibles para suministrar una adecuada supervisión del personal.

(d) Los administradores del trabajo social deberían tomar las medidas razonables para asegurarse de que el entorno de trabajo del cual son responsables es consistente con y fomenta el cumplimiento del Código de Ética de la NASW. Los trabajadores sociales deberían tomar las medidas razonables para eliminar cualquier condición en su organización que viola, interfiere con, o desalienta el cumplimiento del Código.

3.08 Educación Continua y Desarrollo del Personal

Los administradores y supervisores del trabajo social deberían tomar las medidas razonables para suministrar o realizar los arreglos para educación continua y el desarrollo del personal del cual son responsables. La educación continua y el desarrollo del personal deberán tratar el conocimiento actual y los desarrollos emergentes relacionados con el trabajo social y la ética.

3.09 Compromisos con los Empleadores

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían generalmente adherir a los compromisos hechos a los empleadores y organizaciones que los emplean.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales deberían trabajar para mejorar las políticas de las agencias que los emplean y los procedimientos y la eficiencia y efectividad de sus servicios.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales deberían tomar las medidas razonables para asegurarse que los empleadores conozcan las obligaciones éticas de los trabajadores sociales tal como lo establece el Código de Ética de la NASW y de las implicaciones de esas obligaciones para el ejercicio profesional del trabajo social.

(d) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían permitir que la política de la organización empleadora, procedimientos, regulaciones, u órdenes administrativas interfieran con el ejercicio ético del trabajo social. Los trabajadores sociales deberían tomar las medidas razonables para asegurarse que los procedimientos de su organización empleadora son consistentes con el Código de ética de la NASW.

(e) Los trabajadores sociales deben actuar para evitar y eliminar la discriminación en la asignación de trabajos de las organizaciones empleadoras y en sus políticas y procedimientos de empleo.

(f) Los trabajadores sociales deberían aceptar empleo o arreglar la colocación de estudiantes sólo en las agencias que ejercitan prácticas de personal justas.

(g) Los trabajadores sociales deberían ser custodios diligentes de los recursos de sus agencias empleadoras, conservando sabiamente los fondos donde sea apropiado y nunca apropiándose de fondos o utilizarlos para propósitos no previstos.

3.10 Conflictos Trabajador-Gerencia

(a) Los trabajadores sociales pueden involucrarse en acciones organizadas, incluyendo la formación y participación en sindicatos, para mejorar los servicios a los clientes y las condiciones de trabajo.

(b) Las acciones de los trabajadores sociales que se encuentran involucrados en conflictos laborales con la gerencia, acciones de trabajo, o huelgas deberían estar guiados por los valores, principios éticos y normas éticas de la profesión. Existen diferencias razonables de opinión entre los trabajadores sociales en relación a su obligación principal como profesionales durante una huelga que está ocurriendo o amenaza de paro o acción en el trabajo. Los trabajadores sociales deberían examinar detenidamente el posible impacto sobre los clientes antes de adoptar un curso de acción.

4. RESPONSABILIDADES ÉTICAS DE LOS TRABAJADORES SOCIALES COMO PROFESIONALES
4.01 Competencia

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían aceptar responsabilidades o empleo sólo en base a los conocimientos existentes o la intención de adquirir los conocimientos necesarios.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales deberían esforzarse para hacerse y permanecer competentes en la práctica profesional y en la ejecución de sus tareas profesionales. Los trabajadores sociales deberían examinar con sentido crítico y mantenerse al corriente con el conocimiento emergente relevante para el trabajo social. Los trabajadores sociales deberían revisar rutinariamente la literatura profesional y participar en educación continua relevante para la práctica del trabajo social y la ética del trabajo social.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales deberían basar la práctica de su profesión en el conocimiento reconocido, incluyendo el conocimiento empírico, relevante al trabajo social y a la ética del trabajo social.

4.02 Discriminación

Los trabajadores sociales no deberían practicar, perdonar, facilitar, o colaborar con ninguna forma de discriminación sobre la base de raza, etnia, nacionalidad, color, condición migratoria, sexo, orientación sexual,  identidad de género, edad, estado civil, creencia política, religiosa, o discapacidad mental o física.

4.03 Conducta Privada

Los trabajadores sociales no deberían permitir que su conducta privada interfiriera con su capacidad para cumplir con sus responsabilidades profesionales.

4.04 Deshonestidad, Fraude, y Engaño

Los trabajadores sociales no deberían participar en, perdonar, o estar asociados a maniobras deshonestas, fraude o engaño.

4.05 Impedimento

(a) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían permitir que sus propios problemas personales, estrés psicológico, problemas legales, abuso de substancias, o dificultades de salud mental interfieran en su juicio profesional y desempeño o amenazaran los mejores intereses de la persona por la cual tienen una responsabilidad profesional.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales cuyos problemas personales, estrés psicológico, problemas legales, abuso de substancias, o dificultades de salud mental interfirieran con su juicio profesional y desempeño deberían buscar inmediatamente consejo y tomar medidas correctivas apropiadas mediante la búsqueda de ayuda profesional, haciendo ajustes en su carga de trabajo, finalizando el ejercicio profesional, o tomando aquellas medidas necesarias para proteger a sus clientes y a terceros.

4.06 Distorsión

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían efectuar una clara distinción entre las declaraciones y acciones que lo involucran como un individuo privado y como un representante de la profesión de trabajador social, una organización de trabajo social o la agencia que emplea a trabajadores sociales.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales que hablen en nombre de organizaciones profesionales de trabajadores sociales deberían representar en forma precisa la posición oficial y autorizada de las organizaciones.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales deberían asegurarse que sus representaciones a los clientes, agencias y el público de calificaciones profesionales, credenciales, educación, conocimientos, afiliaciones, servicios suministrados, o resultados a ser alcanzados son precisos. Los trabajadores sociales sólo deberían invocar aquellas credenciales relevantes que actualmente poseen y tomar los pasos necesarios para corregir cualquier inexactitud o distorsiones en sus credenciales cometidas por terceros.

4.07 Solicitudes de consentimiento

(a) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían involucrarse en solicitudes de consentimiento no requeridas de potenciales clientes, debido a que por sus circunstancias, son vulnerables a influencia indebida, manipulación y coacción.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales no deberían involucrarse en solicitudes de consentimiento de aval de testimonios (incluyendo solicitudes de consentimiento de utilizar una declaración anterior de un cliente como apoyo a un testimonio) de los actuales clientes o de otras personas que, debido a sus circunstancias particulares, son vulnerables a una influencia indebida.

4.08 Reconocimiento del Crédito

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían asumir la responsabilidad y el crédito, incluyendo el crédito por la autoría, sólo del trabajo que realmente han efectuado y al cual han contribuido.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales deberían reconocer honestamente el trabajo y las contribuciones realizadas por otros.

5. RESPONSABILIDADES ÉTICAS DE LOS TRABAJADORES SOCIALES CON LA PROFESIÓN DEL TRABAJO SOCIAL
5.01 Integridad de la Profesión

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían trabajar para el mantenimiento y promoción de elevados estándares de ejercicio profesional.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales deberían mantener y avanzar en los valores, la ética, el conocimiento y la misión de la profesión. Los trabajadores sociales deberían proteger, elevar y mejorar la integridad de la profesión a través del estudio y la investigación, la discusión activa, y la crítica responsable de la profesión.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales deberían contribuir con tiempo y experiencia profesional a las actividades que promueven el respeto por los valores, la integridad y la competencia de la profesión de trabajo social. Estas actividades podrían incluir la enseñanza, la investigación, el asesoramiento, el servicio, el testimonio legislativo, presentaciones a la comunidad, y participación en sus organizaciones profesionales.

(d) Los trabajadores sociales deberían contribuir a la base de conocimiento del trabajo social y compartir con los colegas su conocimiento relativo al ejercicio de la profesión, investigación, y ética. Los trabajadores sociales deberían buscar contribuir a la literatura de la profesión y compartir su conocimiento en reuniones profesionales y conferencias.

(e) Los trabajadores sociales deberían actuar para evitar el trabajo social no autorizado y no calificado.

5.02 Evaluación e Investigación

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían observar y evaluar políticas, implementación de programas y procedimientos intervención.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales deberían promover y facilitar la evaluación e investigación para promover el desarrollo del conocimiento.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales deberían examinar en forma crítica y mantenerse al tanto del conocimiento corriente relevante al trabajo social y utilizar totalmente la evaluación y la evidencia de la investigación en su ejercicio profesional.

(d) Los trabajadores sociales involucrados en evaluación o investigación deberían considerar cuidadosamente las posibles consecuencias y seguir lineamientos desarrollados para la protección de la evaluación y de los
participantes de la investigación. Deberían consultarse a las juntas de revisión institucional apropiadas.

(e) Los trabajadores sociales involucrados en evaluación o investigación deberían obtener el consentimiento voluntario, informado y escrito, cuando fuera apropiado, de los participantes en la investigación, sin ningún castigo o penalidades caso de que se rehusaran a participar; sin inducirlos indebidamente a participar; y con el debido cuidado por el bienestar, la privacidad y la dignidad de los participantes. El consentimiento informado debería incluir la información acerca de la naturaleza, extensión, y duración de la participación solicitada y la información de los riesgos y beneficios de la participación en la investigación.

(f) Cuando los participantes en la evaluación o en la investigación sean incapaces de brindar consentimiento informado, los trabajadores sociales deberán suministrar una explicación apropiada a los participantes, obtener la aprobación de los participantes en la medida de que sean capaces y obtener consentimiento escrito de un apoderado apropiado.

(g) Los trabajadores sociales jamás deberían diseñar o conducir una evaluación o investigación que no utilice procedimientos consentidos, tales como ciertas formas de observación naturalista e investigación de registros, a menos que una revisión rigurosa y responsable haya encontrado que es justificable debido a su valor científico prospectivo, educacional o valor aplicado y a menos que procedimientos alternativos igualmente efectivos que no implican renuncia de consentimiento no sean posibles.

(h) Los trabajadores sociales deberían informar a los participantes de su derecho a retirarse de una evaluación e investigación en cualquier momento sin ninguna penalidad.

(i) Los trabajadores sociales deberían tomar las medidas necesarias para asegurarse que los participantes en una evaluación e investigación tienen acceso a los apropiados servicios de apoyo.

(j) Los trabajadores sociales involucrados en una evaluación o investigación deberían proteger a los participantes de dolor físico o mental, daño, peligro o privaciones de carácter injustificado.

(k) Los trabajadores sociales involucrados en la evaluación de servicios deberían discutir la información recolectada sólo con propósitos profesionales y con personas involucradas profesionalmente con esta información.

(l) Los trabajadores sociales involucrados en una evaluación o investigación deberían asegurar el anonimato o confidencialidad de los participantes y de los datos obtenidos de ellos. Los trabajadores sociales deberían informar a los participantes de cualquier límite a la confidencialidad, las medidas que se van a tomar para asegurar la confidencialidad y cuando los registros que contienen los datos van a ser destruidos.

(m) Los trabajadores sociales que reporten los resultados de una evaluación e investigación deberían proteger la confidencialidad de los participantes mediante la omisión de información identificatoria a menos que hayan obtenido un consentimiento apropiado autorizando la revelación.

(n) Los trabajadores sociales deberían reportar los hallazgos de la evaluación e investigación en forma precisa. Ellos no deberían fabricar o falsificar resultados y deberían tomar todas las medidas para corregir cualquier error hallado posteriormente en la publicación de los datos utilizando métodos estándares de publicación.

(o) Los trabajadores sociales involucrados en la evaluación o investigación deberían estar alertas a y evitar conflictos de intereses y relaciones duales con los participantes, deberían informar a los participantes cuando un conflicto real o potencial surge, y deberían tomar las medidas para resolver la cuestión de forma de priorizar los intereses de los participantes.

(p) Los trabajadores sociales deberían educarse a sí mismos, a sus estudiantes, y a sus colegas acerca de procedimientos responsables de investigación.

6. RESPONSABILIDADES ÉTICAS DE LOS TRABAJADORES SOCIALES HACIA EL RESTO DE LA SOCIEDAD
6.01 Bienestar Social

Los trabajadores sociales deberían promover el bienestar general de la sociedad, del nivel local al global, y el desarrollo de las personas, sus comunidades y sus entornos. Los trabajadores sociales deberían defender las condiciones de vida conducentes a la satisfacción de las necesidades humanas básicas y deberían promover los valores sociales, económicos, políticos y culturales y las instituciones que son compatibles con la realización de la justicia social.

6.02 Participación Pública

Los trabajadores sociales deberían facilitar la participación informado del público en la elaboración de las políticas sociales e instituciones.

6.03 Emergencias Públicas

Los trabajadores sociales deberían suministrar apropiados servicios profesionales durante emergencias públicas en la mayor medida posible.

6.04 Acción Política y Social

(a) Los trabajadores sociales deberían involucrarse en acciones sociales y políticas que busquen asegurar que la persona tenga un acceso equitativo a los recursos, empleos, servicios y oportunidades que requieran para satisfacer sus necesidades humanas básicas y para desarrollarse plenamente. Los trabajadores sociales deberían estar al tanto del impacto de las cuestiones políticas en la práctica y defender los cambios de política y en la legislación para mejorar las condiciones sociales en orden de satisfacer las necesidades humanas básicas y promover la justicia social.

(b) Los trabajadores sociales deberían actuar para expandir las elecciones y las oportunidades para todas las personas, con especial atención en los vulnerables, los que se encuentran en desventaja, los oprimidos y las personas y grupos explotados.

(c) Los trabajadores sociales deberían promover las condiciones que alientan el respeto por la diversidad social y cultural dentro de los Estados Unidos y globalmente. Los trabajadores sociales deberían promover políticas y procedimientos que demuestren respeto por las diferencias, alientan la expansión del conocimiento cultural y los recursos, defender los programas e instituciones que demuestren competencia cultural y promover políticas que salvaguarden los derechos de y confirmen la equidad y la justicia social para las personas.

(d) Los trabajadores sociales deberían actuar para evitar y eliminar la dominación de, la explotación de, y la discriminación contra cualquier persona, grupo, o clase sobre la base de raza, etnia, nacionalidad, color, condición migratoria, sexo, orientación sexual, identidad de género, edad, estado civil, creencia política, religión, o discapacidad mental o física.


http://www.socialworkers.org/pubs/code/code.asp
7/23/2014
National Association of Social Workers, 750 First Street, NE • Suite 700, Washington, DC 20002-4241.
© 2014 National Association of Social Workers. All Rights Reserved.
  • Update Your Profile in the Member Center
  • Login