Event date: 4/10/2024 - 4/12/2024 Export event
Kyle Northam
/ Categories: Uncategorized

2024 First Annual In-Person Rocky Gap Conference

2024 First Annual In-Person Rocky Gap Conference

Wednesday, Thursday, & Friday, April 10 – 12*, 2024
Rocky Gap Resort & Casino
16701 Lakeview Road, NE
Flintstone, MD 21530

*Friday will be ½ day

 

Full breakfast and lunch included all three days

BOOK A ROOM:

Important Note: NASW-MD has reserved 65 rooms at the Rocky Gap Resort that are available for as low as $139/night* from Tuesday, April 9 – Thursday, April 11th (checkout Friday morning). See rate chart below. For more information and to reserve a room, please call 301-784-8400 or 800-724-0828 and mention that you are with NASW-MD and use the group code FEW 0424. Make your room reservation by March 28th to receive the discounted rate.

*Plus applicable fees and taxes

 

For more information about the resort: https://www.cnty.com/rocky-gap

Please Note: You may be asked to show proof of vaccination and sign a COVID waiver when you sign in at the registration desk. You may also be asked to wear a mask in the classroom.

 

Tuesday, April 9th

4:30 – 6 pm – Welcome Reception

Join us for a pre-conference reception on Monday afternoon from 4:30 – 6 pm (ask for location at check in)

5:30 – 6:30 pm –Optional CE Event - TBD

 

DAY 1: Wednesday, April 10th
(8 CEUS Available)

7:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m. – Registration, full breakfast (provided), and networking

8:30 – 8:45 - Announcements

8:45 a.m. – 9:45 a.m. – Keynote Address

Empowering Social Workers from Practice to Policy

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Anthony Estreet, Ph.D., MBA, LCSW-C
Chief Executive Officer, NASW

9:45 – 10:00 am – Break

10: 00 am – 12:00 pm – Morning Workshop

Unweaving the Web: Addressing HIV and Substance Use Disorders
Speaker: Dr. Anthony Estreet, Ph.D., MBA, LCSW-C
Chief Executive Officer, NASW
Synopsis: details to follow
Learning Objectives: At the end of the session, participants will be able to:
1. Describe the prevalence and death rates of substance use disorders nationally and locally.
2. Describe the association between substance use disorders and HIV (risks and treatment)
3. Identify available FDA approved medications for treatment of substance use disorders
4. Discuss Evidence Based Practices (EBP) to enhance integrated care approach
CE: 2 Cat I

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. – Lunch (provided)

 

1:00p.m. – 4:15 p.m. – Afternoon Session

Struggling to Launch: Dealing with Substance & Electronics Addictions in our Neuroatypical Young Adult Clients

Presenters: Rick Silver, MD
Founder & Director, Thrive Emerge
John Kyle Yearick, LCPC
Addiction Specialist & Mental Health Therapist, Thrive Emerge

Synopsis: Among Neuro divergent teens and young adults, video overuse is a significant problem that disrupts their ability to engage productively at work, school, and social settings. In a group of individuals who already lack sufficient life skills and a psychological foundation that would ensure the resilience necessary for engagement in the demands of independent adult life, these individuals actively avoid those situations and demands that produce what, for them, can be a high level of distress. Additionally, a disruption of a sleep cycle further impairs their ability to engage in normal adult activities. Video overuse is a difficult instead of behaviors for parents to manage and they often feel desperate for resources to shape their young adult’s behavior in more productive ways. In this presentation, Dr. Silver and John Yearick will discuss the roots of video overuse and explore approaches to modifying use based on a 6 week detox treatment which includes all electronics being removed, structured productive activities implementation, and a sleep schedule is established. Participants will learn the steps of the detox and how to educate and support parents during this challenging behavior change process.

Learning Objectives: at the end of this workshop, attendees will understand:
1. The psychological causes of video overuse
2. Family dynamics that might contribute to the situation
3. The steps of the video detox process
4. The psychoeducational messaging and support for parents during this process
5. How to manage resistance and setbacks that occur during the detox process
6. Setting up a long-term treatment program for maintenance of risk reduction or sobriety
CE: 3 Cat I

4:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. - Optional Evening CEU Event

 

Ethical Puzzles: The Case of the Missing Piece

Presenter: Veronica Cruz, LCSW-C
CEO Cruz and Associates
Synopsis: Join us for this fun and interactive workshop where attendees will solve an array of ethical dilemmas using the BSWE and NASW COE. Let's see how well you know your codes! Case examples will focus on boundary issues, mandated reporting, confidentiality, and more. Come add your piece to the puzzle while simultaneously sharpening your ethical skills!
Codes to be included:
Cultural Competency/Humility: Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners (Title 10, .03, .04 & .06) to the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics (1.01- 1.04, 1.07, 2.03, 2.05 & 3.02.
Dual Relationships/Boundaries: Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners (.05 Relationships, A-G) to the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics (1.06, 1.09. 1.16 & 1.17) .
Diverse Practice Setting/Ethical Decision Making:14 A focus will be on analyzing various ethical codes: Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners (Title 10, .03, .04 & .06) to the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics (1.01- 1.04, 1.07, 2.03, 2.05 & 3.02.
CE: 2 Cat II Ethics

 

 

DAY 2: Thursday, April 11th
(6 CEUs available)

7:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m. – Registration, full breakfast (provided), and networking

8:45 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. - Morning Session

To Disclose or Not to Disclose: Ethically, That is the Question
Presenter: Veronica Cruz, LCSW-C
CEO, Cruz and Associates, LLC
Synopsis: Self-disclosure is an ever present and unavoidable aspect of clinical and macro social work. How does one determine when to disclose and when not to disclose? Ethically what helps someone determine their answer? According to Frederic Reamer, many social workers are reluctant to disclose personal information to clients because doing so may stir up complicated transference and countertransference issues that may be counterproductive clinically. Yet sometimes self-disclosure is inevitable, and therefore it is imperative to skillfully handle self-disclosure to avoid or reduce ethical dilemmas. When self-disclosure is not handled effectively it can lead to boundary issues and/or dual relationships. This workshop will explore the importance of understanding and exploring the ethics of self-disclosure. We will examine the intersection between ethics, self-disclosure, and boundary setting.

A focus will be on analyzing various ethical codes: Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners (Title 10, .03, .04 & .05) to the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics (1.01, 1.04, and 1.06 a-h) This is an interactive workshop where case vignettes will be presented, and participants will work in a group setting to further maximize their understanding of the concepts presented.
Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this intermediate course, participants will be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of self-disclosure and the intersection with boundary setting, countertransference, and transference.
2. Explore the four types of self-disclosure: deliberate, unavoidable, accidental, and client initiated.
3. Analyze and deconstruct an array of case examples utilizing various ethical decision-making models, to reduce or eliminate ethical violations.
4. Summarize key elements of balancing ethical responsibilities in relationship to the concepts of self-disclosure and boundary issues.

Please note: This workshop qualifies for the Maryland Board of Social Work Examiners’ the 3-hour Ethics requirement needed for license renewal.

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. – Lunch (provided)

1:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. – Afternoon Session

Women & Addiction: Exploring the Role of Trauma
Presenter: Veronica Cruz, LCSW-C
CEO, Cruz and Associates, LLC
Synopsis:
According to the National Institute of Drug Abuse, men are more likely than women to abuse illicit drugs and alcohol. Substance abuse treatment and interventions have historically been based on the needs of men, but women are just as likely to become substance users. In fact, they are more susceptible to cravings and relapse than their male counterparts. Women respond to drugs and alcohol use differently and present with unique treatment challenges. Research has indicated that substance using women and girls present with a host of problems that contribute to their substance use. The most prominent is a complex history of trauma. In this workshop, the presenter will explore gender differences and addiction, trauma, co-occurring disorders; and gender- specific treatment, including the Women’s Integrated Treatment (WIT) mode. Case vignettes will be presented, and participants will work in a group setting to further maximize their understanding of the concepts presented.
Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this intermediate course, participants will be able to:
1. Appraise the psychological, psychosocial, and developmental effects of trauma and addiction on women.
2. Articulate and analyze the role of trauma and how to address it in the therapeutic relationship.
3. Summarize and express knowledge of comorbidity including mental illness, addiction, and/or medical conditions.
4. Examine and utilize various treatment techniques and modalities that are effective when working with this population.

 

DAY 3: Friday, April 12th (1/2 day)
(3 Category I CEUs available)

7:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. – Registration, full breakfast (provided), and networking

8:45 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. - Morning Session

Gambling Disorder: The Hidden Addiction

Presenter: Kristen Beall (she/her), LCSW-C, UCGC-I, CAC-AD
Clinical Manager, University of Maryland School of Medicine: Maryland Center for Excellence on Problem Gambling
Synopsis: As gambling becomes increasingly accessible throughout Maryland, the harms associated with gambling are likely to escalate. Nationally, gambling helpline calls have risen and have been correlated with the legalization of sports betting. Gambling Disorder became the first behavioral addiction recognized in the DSM-5 as a Substance-Related and Addictive disorder in 2013; yet the disorder remains hidden with limited screening and assessment, lack of understanding of the relationship to other co-occurring disorders, and the impact gambling harms can have on families and the community. Integrating conversations related to gambling into your regular practice can be essential to treating the whole person in their environment.
Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this course participants will learn about:
1. The application of evidenced based gambling screening tools and assessment tips for integrating gambling conversations into your practice, using brief interventions, and recommendations for referrals to treatment.
2. Using treatment strategies and approaches you are familiar with, understanding how they are applicable to the person seeking help for problems related to Gambling Disorder.
3. The importance of financial wellness, the impact finances can have on mental health, and the role finances play in the recovery process related to Gambling Disorder.

12:00 – 12:30 – Boxed Lunch to Go (provided)


COST OF CONFERENCE:

Entire 3-day Conference (Wed., Thurs., Fri.)
$299 for NASW members
$369 for non-members
$249 for Retired Members and Students


Two Days Only: Wednesday, Thursday or Friday
- $249 for NASW members
- $299 for non-members
- $199 Retired members & Students


One Day Only: Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday
- Wednesday - $149 for NASW members; $199 nonmembers; $119 for Retired members and Students
- Thursday - $149 for NASW members; $199 nonmembers; $119 for Retired members and Students
- Friday - $119 for NASW members; $169 nonmembers; $99 for Retired members and Students

 


Please Note: you are ethically responsible for accurately reporting the number of continuing education hours you earn. If you attend a NASW-MD event and arrive late or need to leave early you are responsible for notifying the workshop coordinator. Your CE certificate will be adjusted to reflect the hours of attendance.

Comfort Zone Reminder: Every effort is made to have a comfortable temperature in meeting rooms, but everyone’s comfort level is different. Dress in layers or bring a jacket or sweater in case the room is too cool or warm for your comfort.

 

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